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Volume limit on DSL100 to not blow one of the four G12EVHs in my cab?

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  • #16
    Cable lengths of 50' or less are insignificant in terms of total resistance. Obviously having a larger gauge wire is better if you plan on going with longer lengths, but most speaker cables are not much smaller than 16ga. There is probably more resistance in each of the connections than the wire itself.

    The hard part is knowing if your amp is even up loud enough to be producing full output? The DSL series of amps is more of a preamp-based distortion circuit. So you really don't get too much if any power amp distortion, which means that if you play at modest levels, you are well below peak power output. This assumes that your amp will actually produce the stated output anyway?

    Another thing to keep in mind is the actual rating of the speaker. A greenback is known as a 25-watt speaker, but is that peak watts, or is that continuous watts? Celestions site says the " Nominal " wattage of the EVH G12 is 20-watts. To me, that means its peak wattage is double that, making it capable of handling 40-watts peak. Sending it 40 watts will spell very sudden death for the speaker. I would imagine that the wattage most guitar speakers have is the average wattage they can handle. So you can double the wattage safely as an assumption of their peak rating.

    Guitar playing has a rather low duty cycle. I.E. even if the amp is producing its full rated power when you play, it is only producing that power for very short bursts as you play. Every time you stop, there is no power dissipation, so the average power over time is rather low. Supposing you play full bore and are constantly playing a power chord, perhaps you will have a higher duty cycle, but most songs are 3-4 minutes long and most bands have a 30-second interval between songs when playing live. This may be enough of a break to keep dissipation in a safe place for most low-wattage speakers?

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    • #17
      This part confused me a little. Are you saying that sending the speaker 40W continuously will burn it out quickly?

      Originally posted by Ewizard
      Celestions site says the Nominal wattage of the EVH G12 is 20-watts. To me, that means its peak wattage is double that, making it capable of handling 40-watts peak. Sending it 40 watts will spell very sudden death for the speaker. I would imagine that the wattage most guitar speakers have is the average wattage they can handle. So you can double the wattage safely as an assumption of their peak rating.
      I believe I have a small, dim ember of musical talent glowing within me. I catch a glimpse of it now and then; it is enough to keep me going.

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      • #18
        Then I bid Adieu to this thread.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by misterwhizzy View Post
          Then I bid Adieu to this thread.
          Hey! You come back here!
          I believe I have a small, dim ember of musical talent glowing within me. I catch a glimpse of it now and then; it is enough to keep me going.

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          • #20
            LPG, not exactly. I'm saying that if you sent just the one speaker 40 watts peak for more than a moment, it would likely blow. But you should be able to send it 20 watts all day long, 30 watts for quite some time, but 40 watts it will burn up in short order. This again assumes peak wattage. I would argue that a guitar amp turned all the way up, may produce its peak power, but only so long as you are playing it. So any moment you stop, the average power over time is reduced from the peak wattage to some average below that ( 80 watts for example ). So 4 speakers that say 20 watts each can certainly handle 80 watts of average power from the amplifier.

            Most speakers have 3 wattage ratings, RMS ( also called continuous ), Program ( typical recommended power ), and Peak ( the wattage at which the speaker will die in very short order ). So when I see nominal on a speaker, I consider it to be either RMS, or Program rating, but not peak. The wattage for each rating typically doubles. So a speaker with a 100-watt RMS rating will generally have a 200-watt program rating and a 400-watt peak rating.

            So with Celestion choosing to just give a nominal rating, I would consider that to be either the RMS or the Program rating. The program rating is essentially the ideal power to supply the speaker with. So a speaker with a 20-watt Program rating would be 40-watts Peak and 10-watts RMS. That is why I believe the speaker can handle 20-30 watts with no issue. With 4 of them, you would have at least 80 watts to as much as 120 watts of power handling between them.

            If you are not diming the amp, I don't see why you should have any problems. If you are diming the amp, well, I won't be around to hear it

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            • #21
              Over thinking it by far. You will be fine, just plug in and play. Of course if you are really concerned, just order some Scumbacks M75s in a higher wattage

              FYI the EVH G12M are just relabeled heritage Greenbacks.
              -Chris

              Originally posted by John Suhr
              “Practice cures most tone issues”

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Peaj View Post
                This has been discussed ad nauseum online, "EVH 4X12 is made of four 20 watt speakers but they're secretly not actually 20 watts, they're 25-30, but that's still too low if we're talking 100 watt head, so what's the deal?" But let's take as a starting assumption that the G12EVH is a 25 watt speaker. I've never heard anyone really say it's actually 20 watts, some people have suggested it could be as high as 30 watts in reality. But let's take the average here.

                I'm playing a JCM2000 100 watter, where on the volume does this amp start to punch through that 100 watt ceiling? I once had a Boss TAE for about five seconds (I'm not an attenuator guy) and that device is equipped with a clipping light (the TAE has adjustable wattage and the light trips whenever you push past the setting). The DSL never once triggered it even dimed. By contrast, my Dad's Bassman 50 constantly tripped it.

                What's a safe volume here? Do these preamp-gain-heavy amps like the DSL stay closer to their stated wattage, perhaps? Should I keep below 5? 7? Not that I'll ever need to go that high, but I wanna know the ground rules.
                They're not "20" watts. They are just a regular 25 watt G12M re-issue so ive been told.
                Play guitar/ be happy. If they blow you'll be the first to know.
                Last edited by JMP/HBE; 11-24-2021, 09:04 AM.

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                • #23
                  A lot of people forget that you dont get real tube tone until the voicecoils deform and get stuck in the magnet gaps.
                  I believe I have a small, dim ember of musical talent glowing within me. I catch a glimpse of it now and then; it is enough to keep me going.

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                  • #24
                    So OP are you playing at bedroom or band volumes?


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                    • #25


                      Almost two whole pages and you still haven't got the full stack you want to justify

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