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StewMac Power Pins for Acoustic; anyone tried these?

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  • StewMac Power Pins for Acoustic; anyone tried these?

    https://www.stewmac.com/Hardware_and...SADEgLjnfD_BwE

    Saw these and got curious. Anyone have and use these?

  • #2
    Re: StewMac Power Pins for Acoustic; anyone tried these?

    Just a gimmick to get more of your money. They add mass to the moving top of the guitar, which is not good.
    aka Chris Pile, formerly of Six String Fever

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    • #3
      Re: StewMac Power Pins for Acoustic; anyone tried these?

      I've seen them before. Not sure what problem they're supposed to solve though . . . the only advantage from the design is that you don't have to push the pins out to change strings. Other than that, all I can see are negatives. They put slight additional rotational torque on the guitar and slightly reduce break angle over the bridge. They add mass to an area that it isn't beneficial to add mass to, and they're pretty pricey.
      Join me in the fight against muscular atrophy!

      Originally posted by Douglas Adams
      This planet has - or rather had - a problem, which was this: most of the people living on it were unhappy for pretty much of the time. Many solutions were suggested for this problem, but most of these were largely concerned with the movements of small green pieces of paper, which is odd because on the whole it wasn't the small green pieces of paper that were unhappy.

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      • #4
        Re: StewMac Power Pins for Acoustic; anyone tried these?

        Do you need a Luther to installimafy them?
        I am either a thirtysomething actress or a small farm animal.

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        • #5
          Re: StewMac Power Pins for Acoustic; anyone tried these?

          Do you need a Luther to installimafy them?
          Supposed to be installed by the owner. Lotta luthiers like me would say no-go.
          aka Chris Pile, formerly of Six String Fever

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: StewMac Power Pins for Acoustic; anyone tried these?

            I always thought heavier bridge pins were counter-productive to what you'd want on the top of an acoustic guitar. Come to think of it, why do you even need bridge pins these days? My Adamas doesn't use them. It seems like a better design.
            Dave, Ambassador/Writer/Artist for Seymour Duncan

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            • #7
              Re: StewMac Power Pins for Acoustic; anyone tried these?

              Frank Falbo's Bridge design doesn't use pins, but the entire bridge it built that way from the start. I can verify first-hand the benefits and strengths of that design.

              I was looking at this just as an option... I recently replaced the pins on my Taylor and I had to go through a few sets before I found pins that were tight enough.

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              • #8
                Re: StewMac Power Pins for Acoustic; anyone tried these?

                The other issue with the Power Pins is that luthiers like Jerry Rose feel that they will pull the bridge loose eventually.

                In a normal guitar with bridge pins the ball of the string is inside the guitar against the bridge plate which is inside the guitar.

                With the Power Pins the ball is on top and on the backside of the bridge and pulling forward.

                That's how you remove a loose bridge. You start at the back and pry it up.

                Jerry feels that's what the Power Pins will do too, over time.

                Maybe he's right. Maybe he's wrong. But his argument against using them makes sense to me.
                “Practice cures most tone issues” - John Suhr

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: StewMac Power Pins for Acoustic; anyone tried these?

                  Originally posted by B2D View Post
                  Frank Falbo's Bridge design doesn't use pins, but the entire bridge it built that way from the start. I can verify first-hand the benefits and strengths of that design.

                  I was looking at this just as an option... I recently replaced the pins on my Taylor and I had to go through a few sets before I found pins that were tight enough.
                  I haven't seen his designs, but I always thought that the acoustic bridge, as it appears on most guitars, was in need of a re-design. The idea that we have to use pins is pretty archaic. Frank is on to something here.
                  Dave, Ambassador/Writer/Artist for Seymour Duncan

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: StewMac Power Pins for Acoustic; anyone tried these?

                    Originally posted by Mincer View Post
                    I haven't seen his designs, but I always thought that the acoustic bridge, as it appears on most guitars, was in need of a re-design. The idea that we have to use pins is pretty archaic. Frank is on to something here.
                    Frank's pretty smart and I'm sure he knows what he's doing.

                    Classical guitars use nylon strings and don't have much tension and as we know, the strings are tied to the top of the bridge and don't use bridge pins.

                    Steel string acoustic guitars have much more tension and builders like C.F. Martin learned a century ago that tying steel strings to the back edge of the top of the bridge causes the bridge to lift loose eventually.

                    With bridge pins the strings are actually attached to the bridge plate inside the guitar and under the bridge. Not to the bridge itself.

                    They pass through the bridge, yes, but the ball is against the bridge plate inside the guitar on a Martin type guitar. So really, it's "attached" to the inside of the top...not the bridge.
                    Last edited by Lewguitar; 05-11-2020, 05:29 PM.
                    “Practice cures most tone issues” - John Suhr

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: StewMac Power Pins for Acoustic; anyone tried these?

                      Originally posted by Lewguitar View Post
                      Frank's pretty smart and I'm sure he knows what he's doing.

                      Classical guitars use nylon strings and don't have much tension and as we know, the strings are tied to the top of the bridge and don't use bridge pins.

                      Steel string acoustic guitars have much more tension and builders like C.F. Martin learned a century ago that tying steel strings to the back edge of the top of the bridge causes the bridge to lift loose eventually.

                      With bridge pins the strings are actually attached to the bridge plate inside the guitar and under the bridge. Not to the bridge itself.

                      They pass through the bridge, yes, but the ball is against the bridge plate inside the guitar on a Martin type guitar. So really, it's "attached" to the inside of the top...not the bridge.
                      I get it, but I am surprised Frank (and Ovation, who uses pinless bridges) are among the few that have eliminated the pins. While they work, it is a pretty silly 19th century idea that has only stuck around because of tradition, I think.
                      Dave, Ambassador/Writer/Artist for Seymour Duncan

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: StewMac Power Pins for Acoustic; anyone tried these?

                        And tradition is a very powerful force, no matter what the subject.
                        aka Chris Pile, formerly of Six String Fever

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: StewMac Power Pins for Acoustic; anyone tried these?

                          If you are looking for bridge pins, I'd suggest Tusq, bone or the Liquidmetal pins from Martin. You want light weight, and density. Avoid materials like brass pins as they are too heavy and dampen the top. I personally would not use the Power Pins for many of the reasons others have stated.

                          Fossilized Walrus Ivory or Jawbone, or Mammoth Ivory are good, but I did not hear a huge difference between those and bone and they are much more expensive. Bison horn is often used on guitars like D-18s that use black pins, with similar results to bone. I'm using Tusq pins in a couple of my guitars, and bone pins from Maury's Music in several of my Martins. I do hear a difference, and to my ear an improvement. Tusq pins were a huge improvement over the stock ebony pins in my 2002 Taylor 710CE.

                          And many people don't know this but there are many shapes and sizes of pins. Some have collars, some have a string groove and others don't. (These are good for ramped bridges.) Different MFGs. use different sizes. Maury's site has helpful info for you.

                          Good luck.

                          Bill
                          When you've had budget guitars for a number of years, you may find that your old instrument is holding you back. A quality guitar can inspire you to write great songs, improve your understanding of the Gdim chord while in the Lydian Mode, cure the heartbreak of cystic acne--and help you find true love in the process.

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                          • #14
                            Re: StewMac Power Pins for Acoustic; anyone tried these?

                            - Yeah, it's really hard to change strings on acoustics?

                            It's even easier than stringthrough body and stop tail tuneomatic where you have to either cut string or drag it full length through to get old ones out.

                            I think standard pins are really good invention.

                            And as it looked there is a plate where I glue kksound pure mini usually, right where standard pins comes through underneath.
                            Wood vibrating, who wants to replace that.....it's going direct to mikes....

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: StewMac Power Pins for Acoustic; anyone tried these?

                              Originally posted by Boogie Bill View Post
                              If you are looking for bridge pins, I'd suggest Tusq, bone or the Liquidmetal pins from Martin. You want light weight, and density. Avoid materials like brass pins as they are too heavy and dampen the top. I personally would not use the Power Pins for many of the reasons others have stated.

                              Fossilized Walrus Ivory or Jawbone, or Mammoth Ivory are good, but I did not hear a huge difference between those and bone and they are much more expensive. Bison horn is often used on guitars like D-18s that use black pins, with similar results to bone. I'm using Tusq pins in a couple of my guitars, and bone pins from Maury's Music in several of my Martins. I do hear a difference, and to my ear an improvement. Tusq pins were a huge improvement over the stock ebony pins in my 2002 Taylor 710CE.

                              And many people don't know this but there are many shapes and sizes of pins. Some have collars, some have a string groove and others don't. (These are good for ramped bridges.) Different MFGs. use different sizes. Maury's site has helpful info for you.

                              Good luck.

                              Bill
                              I get my nuts and bridge saddles from Don Colosi. www.guitarsaddles.com/

                              Pins too. I like the Mammoth and Walrus Ivory pins with the Abalone inlay.

                              My Taylors came with Tusq nuts and saddles but I replaced the plastic pins with fossilized Ivory.

                              Tusq is hard but seems softer than bone or ivory. It still sounds very good to me though.

                              I think bone and ivory give a more brilliant and louder tone, but they all sound good.

                              Jerry Rosa uses Elk Antler for his bridge saddles.

                              His repair videos are very informative and entertaining. Check out Rosa Stringworks on YouTube.
                              Last edited by Lewguitar; 05-12-2020, 10:46 AM.
                              “Practice cures most tone issues” - John Suhr

                              Comment

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