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Care of lacquer finishes

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  • #16
    Re: Care of lacquer finishes

    P.S. If you want to rub out some of the fine scratches, you can polish with any of a wide variety of things. Paste wax, car polish, etc.
    Originally posted by LesStrat
    Yogi Berra was correct.
    Originally posted by JOLLY
    I do a few chord things, some crappy lead stuff, and then some rhythm stuff.

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: Care of lacquer finishes

      Don’t a lot of car waxes and polishes have silicone?
      What’s funnier than putting up roadblocks to stop the advance of someone who’s running away from you at four hundred miles an hour?

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      • #18
        Re: Care of lacquer finishes

        Originally posted by TMD View Post
        Don’t a lot of car waxes and polishes have silicone?
        Professional polishing products should not. Classic Johnson Paste Wax does not.

        But silicone is only an issue when finishes are still off-gassing...which, if properly applied, a lacquer finish should not be doing for long. Certain products, like Deft and Color-Tone (if it is from Stew-Mac, you can pretty much count on it being relative crap), can be problematic. But most lacquers fully dry very quickly, unless you’re really laying them on thickly.

        If I am going to bother polishing a guitar (which I almost never do), I use classic Johnson’s Paste Wax, or the same 3M white professional polishing compound that I use to do the final polish when I paint finishes myself.

        Same exact products I use on my old lacquered furniture, FWIW.
        Last edited by ItsaBass; 07-06-2020, 11:06 AM.
        Originally posted by LesStrat
        Yogi Berra was correct.
        Originally posted by JOLLY
        I do a few chord things, some crappy lead stuff, and then some rhythm stuff.

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: Care of lacquer finishes

          Originally posted by TMD View Post
          Forgot to ask: What do you use to clean and polish nitro finishes?
          https://www.guitarcenter.com/MusicNo...cnomad&index=7

          it takes me about 5 years to go through 1 of these sets, polishing 5 Gibsons and 7 other guitars. It works better than anything else I've tried for nitro finishes, and works great on poly, too. I don't use it in on my satin finished Rickenbacker because it doesn't need it really and I use a special aluminium cleaner for my aluminium guitars but the MusicNomad product line is the only legit guitar care system in my humble opinion. When they first came out my store had a dirty black Les Paul Custom from the 70s and we polished one half with Gibson's luthier polish and the other half with the MusicNomad kit and the Nomad half came out black, rich and shiny while the Gibson half stayed foggy and whitish. I wish I had a photo of that guitar still. We e-mailed a pic to the guy who makes the stuff and when he called to thank us he kept changing the subject to how all of the products are all-natural and plant-based so they're good for your skin and hair, too. Not gona lie, there were more than a few times where I had just oiled up a fretboard and had some grease on my fingers that ended up brushing some hair out of my face and it definitely didn't hurt anything... hahaha
          green globe burned black by sunn

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          • #20
            Re: Care of lacquer finishes

            Now I’m starting to get paranoid somebody’s going to recommend something that will dissolve the lacquer.
            What’s funnier than putting up roadblocks to stop the advance of someone who’s running away from you at four hundred miles an hour?

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: Care of lacquer finishes

              Originally posted by TMD View Post
              Now I’m starting to get paranoid somebody’s going to recommend something that will dissolve the lacquer.
              Re-read my post up the page. You should rarely have to use “products,” if at all. Water does most of what you need. Dish soap if not that. Ivory if not that. Polishing products are just if you want to rub the finish out, and any professional polishing product is completely lacquer safe.
              Last edited by ItsaBass; 07-07-2020, 06:01 PM.
              Originally posted by LesStrat
              Yogi Berra was correct.
              Originally posted by JOLLY
              I do a few chord things, some crappy lead stuff, and then some rhythm stuff.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by ItsaBass View Post
                Re: Care of lacquer finishes

                Do yourself a favor: Buy several of the classic design Hamilton guitar/bass stands. Best design on the market, totally safe for solvent-based finishes, last forever, folds up small enough to fit in the back of a combo amp or in a gig bag, the most stable of any folding stand, and among the most affordable stands sold. With these out there at 25 bucks, there's almost no reason for anyone to buy any other folding guitar stand. I've had my pair for something like 25 years, and I invested less than people spend these days on a single stand that will eat their finish and/or not last for the long haul. Never a dive, never any finish damage, have gigged with them for literally decades. Everything else feels like garbage to me, and costs too much as well.

                https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...SABEgKH2fD_BwE
                What’s funnier than putting up roadblocks to stop the advance of someone who’s running away from you at four hundred miles an hour?

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by TMD View Post
                  Right on!

                  I would spread the legs a little wider. The struts can get down to the ground, which widens the footprint of the stand. I set them almost flat, maybe 5 or 10 degrees from the ground.

                  You can also lower the center post a bit, to get your guitar almost to the ground. The lower it sits, the more stable it is.

                  Also, I see that the knobs have changed since I bought mine in the '90s. They used to be simple round knobs.
                  Originally posted by LesStrat
                  Yogi Berra was correct.
                  Originally posted by JOLLY
                  I do a few chord things, some crappy lead stuff, and then some rhythm stuff.

                  Comment

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