Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Stainless frets

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Stainless frets

    Who loves them, who hates them, but mostly, who has extensive first hand knowledge?
    "Patience is key. Hard work is obligatory. And itís the decisions you make right now, not the habits of the past, that will shape your success in the future." - Janek Gwizdala

  • #2
    i have two guitars with em and i cant find anything not to like

    Comment


    • #3
      Are you typically rough on frets?
      "Patience is key. Hard work is obligatory. And itís the decisions you make right now, not the habits of the past, that will shape your success in the future." - Janek Gwizdala

      Comment


      • #4
        Love them, and I only see upsides to them.
        Dave, Ambassador/Writer/Artist for Seymour Duncan

        Comment


        • #5
          Got them on my Parker there is nothing not to love. I never have to be concerned about wear they are set it and forget it. Those frets will outlive me.


          | Gear Reviews | Beer | Babes | The Internet's Only Unedited & Uncensored Musician's Forum | Sports |

          Comment


          • #6
            I now have 3 with stainless.
            They will even make you want to keep your other guitar's standard frets well-polished.

            Comment


            • #7
              I have plenty of experience with playing on them, though I haven't actually done any of my own fretwork on them.

              I always order necks with them now (unless the neck is pre-made), and I will always choose them for re-frets, except perhaps on certain "vintage" instruments on which I want to retain fully original specs.

              No real-world tonal difference and no appreciable difference in feel IMO. They have the great benefit of making future fret levels and re-frets a very rare thing.

              Any time you can install something that makes no real-world difference in the tone or playability of the instrument, and prevents future heavily invasive surgeries from having to be done, it's a good thing.
              Last edited by ItsaBass; 09-21-2020, 01:46 PM.
              Originally posted by LesStrat
              Yogi Berra was correct.
              Originally posted by JOLLY
              I do a few chord things, some crappy lead stuff, and then some rhythm stuff.

              Comment


              • #8
                I think we will see more and more stock instruments come with them. There are lots of upsides, and it will be a selling point.
                Dave, Ambassador/Writer/Artist for Seymour Duncan

                Comment


                • #9
                  I only buy guitars and basses with SS frets now. I have been playing on them for over a decade now. I love things that last and I am a bit rough on frets. I have a bass without them and yikes it needs work. I have a guitar without them and it needs some fret work after 13 years. My SS frets look like they are still new! So, yeah, I am a believer...
                  Soundcloud

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have 1 guitar with stainless steel frets and they're the best. Super easy to bend strings on them and they don't wear out. Highly recommended.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      If I have the option for stainless, I choose it. First experience was on a Parker and I immediately wondered why that wasn't the standard 20 years ago. Every Warmoth neck I order has them.

                      Today, it warms my heart to see that they are becoming somewhat commonplace and even "budget" guitars are being introduced with them.

                      Absolutely no downsides aside from the installation standpoint. There's even a company in Texas that specializes in stainless refrets...they don't even bother with nickel-silver anymore!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Yeah, we should have been adopting them on everything 20 years ago. Guitar companies are pretty slow to adapt to new things, unless they are forced (like finding alternative woods because the ones they use aren't around anymore).
                        Dave, Ambassador/Writer/Artist for Seymour Duncan

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Yep like Richlite. I think if more people played Richlite necks more people would adopt the material. I absolutely prefer it and I can feel a difference now when I am playing rosewood or ebony.


                          | Gear Reviews | Beer | Babes | The Internet's Only Unedited & Uncensored Musician's Forum | Sports |

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Securb View Post
                            Yep like Richlite. I think if more people played Richlite necks more people would adopt the material. I absolutely prefer it and I can feel a difference now when I am playing rosewood or ebony.
                            My Godin has a Richlite fingerboard. I dig it.
                            Dave, Ambassador/Writer/Artist for Seymour Duncan

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I custom ordered a bass neck with Richlite, white binding, and no inlays. It's basically Bakelite/Garolite – phenolic sheet, just like the early Telecaster/Esquire/P-Bass guards. I plan on using a Garolite guard on the bass, and gloss coating both the guard and the board. It will look fantastic. It feels great too. I feared what will happen on this material during re-frets...which is why I ordered the neck with stainless 6230s.

                              Also, my 2018 Les Paul Classic Player Plus has a Richlite board. It gave me a highly desirable set of features that I want in a Les Paul: P90s, WHITE binding (not cream), vintage sunburst finish with an intense yellow in the middle, only mild flame, and a black fretboard. The Richlite looks and feels great. I don't care that it's not ebony. The fact that this set of specs was put together by Henry J's Gibson still astounds me. I'm not going to split hairs about ebony vs. phenolic, as long as it's black.

                              There are other cases in which I would spec ebony for a build. But I am not against either of these materials.

                              Here's the Classic Player Plus (not mine, but the same model):

                              Click image for larger version  Name:	ns2g5mznrn0f5baofpxl.jpg Views:	0 Size:	62.9 KB ID:	6018330
                              Last edited by ItsaBass; 09-21-2020, 01:59 PM.
                              Originally posted by LesStrat
                              Yogi Berra was correct.
                              Originally posted by JOLLY
                              I do a few chord things, some crappy lead stuff, and then some rhythm stuff.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X