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Les Paul with headstock repair value?

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  • #76
    Originally posted by ICTGoober View Post
    I wasn't addressing anyone in particular. I was just..... pontificating as per normal.
    Ha... So is there a neck joint that is standard practice that you would consider running away from upon site?

    For me, when everything goes wrong thats when adventure starts. Yvonne Chouinard

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    • #77
      Ha... So is there a neck joint that is standard practice that you would consider running away from upon site?
      Standard practice.... there's a loaded phrase. But in answer to your question, I can't think of one.

      aka Chris Pile, formerly of Six String Fever

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      • #78
        Originally posted by NegativeEase View Post

        Yeah, I was expecting ICT to drop some deep knowledge on his issue with Scarf joints -or anybody really -other than the traditional opinion of disliking them because they are not traditional (Scarfs originally emerged in cheaper guitars If I'm not mistaken)... as from my experience, they are superior by most measure unless the time to make the neck is your measure for not a good method -which I don't factor that at all.

        Leo Fender avoided all of this mess with an even cheaper and more innovative methodology of course -but with some small downsides too.

        I'm open to being educated on Scarf joints by anyone with experience. -I don't have a strong opinion either way.
        I believe scarf joints have been used in classical guitar construction for at least 150 years and probably date back much farther than that.

        The word luthier originally stood for someone who built lutes. Looking at medieval lutes, most had a headstock that makes the notorious 17 angle on fifties-spec Gibsons look tame by comparison. Some literally look to be nearly 90. Even with a relatively short scale and gut strings, I think most (or at least most of the ones that survived) must've employed a scarf joint. When the lute evolved into the Spanish guitar this tradition carried over.
        eclecticsynergy
        Mojo's Minions
        Last edited by eclecticsynergy; 03-01-2021, 02:08 PM.
        .
        "My hovercraft is full of eels."
        .

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        • #79
          The tradition of oud making is at least as old, and the pegheads on most of them is about 80 degrees from the fingerboard. Obviously scarfed.
          aka Chris Pile, formerly of Six String Fever

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          • #80
            Originally posted by ICTGoober View Post
            The tradition of oud making is at least as old, and the pegheads on most of them is about 80 degrees from the fingerboard. Obviously scarfed.
            Yah, that hadn't occurred to me. I think the oud probably predates the lute - might even have inspired it.
            .
            "My hovercraft is full of eels."
            .

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            • #81
              Originally posted by eclecticsynergy View Post

              I believe scarf joints have been used in classical guitar construction for at least 150 years and probably date back much farther than that.
              Yep, they go back to the 1600's here it is being used on a Stradivarius Guitar




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