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Warmoth Project #2

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  • #16
    Sweet project. What's your thoughts on the roller nut? I've read mixed reviews. Some say great for a tremolo, while others say "tone suckers."

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    • #17
      Originally posted by ArtieToo View Post
      Sweet project. What's your thoughts on the roller nut? I've read mixed reviews. Some say great for a tremolo, while others say "tone suckers."
      Great for trem use. I never have directly compared on the same guitar with a traditional one, and then a roller one. But the Strats that came from the factory with one always sounded great, and I have no complaints.
      Dave, Ambassador/Writer/Artist for Seymour Duncan

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      • #18
        Originally posted by ICTGoober
        You're following Cagey's method of burnishing the neck?
        Exactly! My results are similar to his. It looks and feels fantastic. For anyone interested, the thread on the Warmoth forum is here.

        Originally posted by PFDarkside View Post
        How did you choose the True Tone jack?
        Read about it, then came across someone I knew selling it in a lot of parts. It is black, so it will match the hardware. I don't know if it is any better than a Switchcraft, as I've never directly compared. But it is a seriously industrial piece of hardware.
        Dave, Ambassador/Writer/Artist for Seymour Duncan

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        • #19
          I might try that sanding method out on my roasted maple neck. It plays and feels amazing but I'm up for making it better. I've got some other work to do on it as well, adding resistor to the WLH neck split to make it a partial split, level/crown/polish the frets. Perfect time to sand the back of the neck.

          My old Warmoth neck has been played so much it's got the perfect feel it to it. That one is staying as-is.
          Last edited by ErikH; 03-10-2021, 08:06 AM.

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          • #20
            I finished sanding last night. 1 hour with 2000 grit, and then Birchwood Casey Gun Stock wax. You wipe it on with a paper towel, let it sit for 10 minutes, and wipe it off. The neck feels like glass now without that 'sticky' feeling of plastic finishes.
            I do a similar procedure on my Music Man neck every year: sand with 600 and 1000 grit, clean with Murphy's Oil Soap, and then the Gun Stock Wax.

            Today I will most likely get to the installation of the LSR nut, and the tuners. The holes for the nut are already drilled, and the tuners don't need additional holes.
            Dave, Ambassador/Writer/Artist for Seymour Duncan

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            • #21
              What prompted you to go with a scalloped neck? It's so..... Eighties....
              aka Chris Pile, formerly of Six String Fever

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              • #22
                Originally posted by ICTGoober View Post
                What prompted you to go with a scalloped neck? It's so..... Eighties....
                Used one for 25 years. Feels a lot more natural. Also, the players I were listening to (john McLaughlin & Ritchie Blackmore) used them and when I finally tried one, it made sense to me.
                Dave, Ambassador/Writer/Artist for Seymour Duncan

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Mincer View Post

                  Used one for 25 years. Feels a lot more natural. Also, the players I were listening to (john McLaughlin & Ritchie Blackmore) used them and when I finally tried one, it made sense to me.
                  Are they easier to play, or does it just seem that way because of the illusion of less pressure to hold notes, I imagine it takes a lighter touch than standard boards.

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                  • #24
                    For me, they are easier. You press until the string just contacts the top of the fret and stop, unlike on a non-scalloped guitar, some people press until they feel wood. It is great for bending, too, as there is no hump in the middle of the fretboard to run into, and the strings have no way to slide under your finger accidently. I don't think it is for everyone, but as soon as I started using one, I was convinced what it could do for me.
                    Dave, Ambassador/Writer/Artist for Seymour Duncan

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                    • #25
                      I like the feel of scalloped a lot. To me it's all benefit. All you feel is string and it trains your fingers to automatically get the string right in the proper area of you fingertip for control. You don't end up just smashing your fingers down on string and board. I'd get them if they weren't more expensive haha.
                      The things that you wanted
                      I bought them for you

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                      • #26
                        That neck and pickups look pretty awesome. Let us know how you get on with the truetone jack. I've been very interested in them, but haven't been able to convince myself they're worth the regular retail price!
                        Join me in the fight against muscular atrophy!

                        Originally posted by Douglas Adams
                        This planet has - or rather had - a problem, which was this: most of the people living on it were unhappy for pretty much of the time. Many solutions were suggested for this problem, but most of these were largely concerned with the movements of small green pieces of paper, which is odd because on the whole it wasn't the small green pieces of paper that were unhappy.

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                        • #27
                          Yeah, I am interested in how it will work. It looks pretty solid. How it will last, well, I don't know yet. I like that it was available in black though!
                          Dave, Ambassador/Writer/Artist for Seymour Duncan

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                          • #28
                            LSR Nut & Hipshot open gear locking tuners installed. The headstock will eventually have a black metallic Warmoth logo on it.

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                            Dave, Ambassador/Writer/Artist for Seymour Duncan

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                            • #29
                              Have you used the Hipshot locking tuners before? I’m considering them for my build as well.
                              Oh no.....


                              Oh Yeah!

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by PFDarkside View Post
                                Have you used the Hipshot locking tuners before? I’m considering them for my build as well.
                                A student's guitar had them. These may be the lightest locking tuners I've tried- they are open-geared, so there isn't a metal shell around them. I also like the funky tuner shape, too.
                                Dave, Ambassador/Writer/Artist for Seymour Duncan

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