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Of course vintage picks are better… (Eric Johnson)

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  • Of course vintage picks are better… (Eric Johnson)

    https://www.jimdunlop.com/eric-johnson-jazz-iii/


    I mean, why wouldn’t vintage picks be better, right?

    To create the Eric Johnson Jazz III Pick, we laser-scanned a vintage Jazz III from Eric's collection and recreated it with the most advanced molding techniques available. The result is a Jazz III with a more refined and smooth tip, more flexibility, and a matte finish with raised logos for an incredible gripping surface.
    ​​​​​​
    Oh no.....


    Oh Yeah!

  • #2
    wow
    ISO - Fender Highway One Stratocaster - black
    2004 Chevy Silveraro - 6.6 Liter Duramax Turbo Diesel
    Pickup Booster - Lava Box - Tweak Fuzz - Vapor Trail

    Comment


    • #3
      So it's ready to throw away right off the bat,,,,,,,,,,great idea!

      Comment


      • #4
        Exactly! I have a pile of heavy relic vintage jazz IIIs in a drawer at home that I'm willing to sell to any connoisseur willing to buy 'em.
        Join me in the fight against muscular atrophy!

        Originally posted by Douglas Adams
        This planet has - or rather had - a problem, which was this: most of the people living on it were unhappy for pretty much of the time. Many solutions were suggested for this problem, but most of these were largely concerned with the movements of small green pieces of paper, which is odd because on the whole it wasn't the small green pieces of paper that were unhappy.

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        • #5
          I just realized, it’s basically a matte Jazz III, but with some other “peculiarities”.
          Oh no.....


          Oh Yeah!

          Comment


          • #6
            I’m with EJ on this one. Picks matter a lot to me, and having the right one makes a big difference.

            My latest rabbit hole is casein picks. Casein is a milk protein-based material that’s supposed to be very similar in use to tortoise shell. I have a few from D’Addario, and a couple Red Bears. I like them a lot.

            Also have a bunch of really old Fender Heavies in various shapes, from the 60’s and 70’s. They’re pretty different from the modern version.
            Last edited by JB_From_Hell; 07-28-2021, 04:06 PM.
            "Patience is key. Hard work is obligatory. And itís the decisions you make right now, not the habits of the past, that will shape your success in the future." - Janek Gwizdala

            Comment


            • #7
              That's a pretty bloated description just to say "hey, we recreated one of EJ's worn down picks and stuck his name on it!"

              Comment


              • #8
                It's not about Eric Johnson, but I have a weird pick story.....

                Back in the 70's at the first music store I ever worked in, I was told to watch for jazz guitarist Jerry Hahn coming in for a box of Fender heavy picks - already paid for. The owner went to lunch and there I was alone. Jerry soon came in (I'd never met him, but knew what he looked like) and asked for the box of picks. He dumped the box of picks out on the counter, and started bouncing them. He'd bounce them a couple times, sorting them into two piles of picks. He went through all of them, swept one pile of picks into the box and moved the others toward me. "You can keep these, I don't want them". I protested, saying he paid for the whole box. "Nope, no problem. Mac (the owner) and I have an agreement". And out he went....

                When the owner came back I informed him Jerry had picked up the order, and about his sorting of picks. Mac laughed and said, "He was looking for the picks that bounced highest. He says they have more energy in them". I guess my face looked amazed.... Mac continued, "Now he'll take them home and let them age in a dark closet for a year before he uses them". .... Okay......

                Later, I tell some other guys who studied under him at WSU this story and one guy says, "MAN! We had a party at his house the other day with his sons, and if I'd known that, I would have found his stash of picks and put them out in the sunlight to ruin them!".
                aka Chris Pile, formerly of Six String Fever

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                • #9
                  That’s pretty fascinating.

                  I agree picks are important, I got some Hetfield signature picks and the material, pointy tip and grip are quite nice. My quick picking increased by 10% just with the sharp tip.
                  I also got some regular Jazz III, great for precise picking but not for strumming.
                  Oh no.....


                  Oh Yeah!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I agree they're important too... but making picks looked used... weird.
                    I use stainless steel picks.
                    ISO - Fender Highway One Stratocaster - black
                    2004 Chevy Silveraro - 6.6 Liter Duramax Turbo Diesel
                    Pickup Booster - Lava Box - Tweak Fuzz - Vapor Trail

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Picks matter to me, too, but I don't generally care what EJ or any other guitar hero likes. A pick isn't like a guitar...it is a lot more personal.
                      Dave, Ambassador/Writer/Artist for Seymour Duncan

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Mincer View Post
                        Picks matter to me, too, but I don't generally care what EJ or any other guitar hero likes. A pick isn't like a guitar...it is a lot more personal.
                        I agree, but especially on acoustic instruments, I pay a lot of attention to what the top players are using. When I’m playing bluegrass guitar or mandolin, there’s the instrument, the strings, the pick, and my hands. The pick’s role in the equation is infinitely larger, and what I’m going for in bluegrass is a lot more similar to what everyone else is: speed and clarity.

                        If Bryan Sutton, Chris Thile, Billy Strings, Ronnie McCoury, etc… are all using D’Addario strings and BlueChip picks, I’m gonna try those.
                        "Patience is key. Hard work is obligatory. And itís the decisions you make right now, not the habits of the past, that will shape your success in the future." - Janek Gwizdala

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by JB_From_Hell View Post

                          I agree, but especially on acoustic instruments, I pay a lot of attention to what the top players are using. When I’m playing bluegrass guitar or mandolin, there’s the instrument, the strings, the pick, and my hands. The pick’s role in the equation is infinitely larger, and what I’m going for in bluegrass is a lot more similar to what everyone else is: speed and clarity.

                          If Bryan Sutton, Chris Thile, Billy Strings, Ronnie McCoury, etc… are all using D’Addario strings and BlueChip picks, I’m gonna try those.
                          I think it depends on your goals. While I love to listen to good bluegrass players, there are no reasons why I'd want to sound like them. Bluegrass is a very specific technique, and their picking developed because they needed volume. So, strong attacks, careful attention to the strong beat and cross picking developed because they had to compete with a very loud banjo. That isn't my goal, so my acoustic technique developed in a different way (my sound did, too). I understand if you are going for a very traditional sound, it would make sense to see how it was done, and copy it ("no need to re-invent the wheel").
                          My personal choices with picks (and how I pick) is something I had to figure out, as there was no roadmap. As it is, I don't think 'signature picks' take off in quite the same way as 'signature guitars and amps'.
                          Dave, Ambassador/Writer/Artist for Seymour Duncan

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mincer View Post

                            I think it depends on your goals. While I love to listen to good bluegrass players, there are no reasons why I'd want to sound like them. Bluegrass is a very specific technique, and their picking developed because they needed volume. So, strong attacks, careful attention to the strong beat and cross picking developed because they had to compete with a very loud banjo. That isn't my goal, so my acoustic technique developed in a different way (my sound did, too). I understand if you are going for a very traditional sound, it would make sense to see how it was done, and copy it ("no need to re-invent the wheel").
                            My personal choices with picks (and how I pick) is something I had to figure out, as there was no roadmap. As it is, I don't think 'signature picks' take off in quite the same way as 'signature guitars and amps'.
                            Agree 100%. I’m still new to BG, and I usually hate purism, but 13s on a dreadnought and a thick, beveled pick is pretty much the way to do that sound.

                            "Patience is key. Hard work is obligatory. And itís the decisions you make right now, not the habits of the past, that will shape your success in the future." - Janek Gwizdala

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by PFDarkside View Post
                              I also got some regular Jazz III, great for precise picking but not for strumming.
                              I've been using Jazz IIIs (or very similar picks) for all my strumming for years with no problem, and I play a lot of fast funk stuff. Even with my acoustic. There's a slight adjustment from a regular pick but they get quite comfortable with practice.
                              Join me in the fight against muscular atrophy!

                              Originally posted by Douglas Adams
                              This planet has - or rather had - a problem, which was this: most of the people living on it were unhappy for pretty much of the time. Many solutions were suggested for this problem, but most of these were largely concerned with the movements of small green pieces of paper, which is odd because on the whole it wasn't the small green pieces of paper that were unhappy.

                              Comment

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