banner

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ugh, Floating Trem

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Ugh, Floating Trem

    I know there have been some discussions lately about this, but I can't find the threads so here it goes again. Sorry for the grumpy tone.

    One of my guitars has a floating tremolo, Floyd 1000. I've had it for 18 months, played it extensively, and I want to enjoy the soft feel of the bar, the extra bit of travel, the shimmery warble. But it feels weird and I'm just not convinced that the fuss is worth it. There's something different about it compared to a decked Strat tremolo (which I totally dig). Here are the pros and cons of the floating tremolo.
    Pros: can pretend to be Jeff Beck/Satch/Vai, which I never do. Can do extra large bends, which doesn't compel me.
    Cons: can never do alternate or drop tunings. Fussy to tune. Bends screw up any drone notes. Picking hard creates a warble and uneven sound.

    What can I do? Should I block the thing? Can I replace the bridge with a fixed bridge? Would more springs make it feel more "solid", and is that a good thing? What devices are "tried and true" for stabilizing/blocking the bridge, and which ones are bunk?

    Or is it worthwhile, long-term, to leave it as is and give myself the chance to develop a style on it? I love so much about this instrument and selling it is not in the playbook.

    The guitar is basically this one: https://www.sweetwater.com/store/det...fire-red-burst
    https://www.sweetwater.com/store/det...fire-red-burst
    Originally posted by crusty philtrum
    Anyone who *sings* at me through their teeth deserves to have a bus drive through their face
    http://www.youtube.com/alexiansounds

  • #2
    The blocked trem thing is fine. I did that for a long while when first getting a floyded guitar. Just cut a bit of wood and stick it in place with a drop of superglue in the trem cavity and it'll come right out if you don't like it later. The sound changes when it's blocked than when it's floating too. Not necessarily better or worse, but it's definitely different - a bit bassier for sure.

    My trem guitars are all set up free floating with .10-52s or .11s in standard tuning and five springs on the claw, which I find significantly reduces weird warbly sounds from heavy picking. The trem moves smoothly and it's much easier to control than a regular floyd set up (which can be a little floppy when trying to do subtle) . . . it's great for gentle wobble on chords or double stops, and can still do dive bombs if you need that.
    Join me in the fight against muscular atrophy!

    Originally posted by Douglas Adams
    This planet has - or rather had - a problem, which was this: most of the people living on it were unhappy for pretty much of the time. Many solutions were suggested for this problem, but most of these were largely concerned with the movements of small green pieces of paper, which is odd because on the whole it wasn't the small green pieces of paper that were unhappy.

    Comment


    • #3
      Tremsetter
      Originally posted by Bad City
      He's got the crowd on his side and the blue jean lights in his eyes...

      Comment


      • #4
        https://forum.seymourduncan.com/foru...er-from-russia

        Comment


        • #5
          Option one: accept that a Floyd rose style tremolo is not for you. Sell the guitar and get something you’re more happy with.

          Option two: install a tremol-no or other tremolo-blocking gadget that can fully block your tremolo, or set it for dive only. Dive only will allow you to do alternate tunings without going out of tune because it will keep the bridge from sinking into the cavity.


          Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

          Comment


          • #6
            Having purchased and used a tremolo-no for a while, I would never recommend one.
            Join me in the fight against muscular atrophy!

            Originally posted by Douglas Adams
            This planet has - or rather had - a problem, which was this: most of the people living on it were unhappy for pretty much of the time. Many solutions were suggested for this problem, but most of these were largely concerned with the movements of small green pieces of paper, which is odd because on the whole it wasn't the small green pieces of paper that were unhappy.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by alex1fly View Post
              I know there have been some discussions lately about this, but I can't find the threads so here it goes again. Sorry for the grumpy tone.

              One of my guitars has a floating tremolo, Floyd 1000. I've had it for 18 months, played it extensively, and I want to enjoy the soft feel of the bar, the extra bit of travel, the shimmery warble. But it feels weird and I'm just not convinced that the fuss is worth it. There's something different about it compared to a decked Strat tremolo (which I totally dig). Here are the pros and cons of the floating tremolo.
              Pros: can pretend to be Jeff Beck/Satch/Vai, which I never do. Can do extra large bends, which doesn't compel me.
              Cons: can never do alternate or drop tunings. Fussy to tune. Bends screw up any drone notes. Picking hard creates a warble and uneven sound.

              What can I do? Should I block the thing? Can I replace the bridge with a fixed bridge? Would more springs make it feel more "solid", and is that a good thing? What devices are "tried and true" for stabilizing/blocking the bridge, and which ones are bunk?

              Or is it worthwhile, long-term, to leave it as is and give myself the chance to develop a style on it? I love so much about this instrument and selling it is not in the playbook.

              The guitar is basically this one: https://www.sweetwater.com/store/det...fire-red-burst
              https://www.sweetwater.com/store/det...fire-red-burst
              I am a 38 year floating Kahler cam tremolo user. Last year I got a Fender LE HM Strat with a Floyd - my first Floyd. The Floyd is so much freer floating, it was a struggle just fine tuning it. I truly wanted this HM Strat and it does a much better "Cricket" than my Kahlers, so I was determined to keep it and work at making peace with the Floyd.

              I am still not 100% with the Floyd, but I am much better than last year. I find the Floyd is requiring a much lighter touch while playing than I am used to with my Kahlers or a Fender trem.

              My goal with the Floyd does not include alternate tunings or blocking it. More springs will make a Floyd feel more solid, but I already have that with my Kahlers. Again, I am focusing on adapting to the Floyd.

              Best of luck pursuing your goal(s) for your Floyd.
              I miss the 80's (girls) !!!

              Seymour Duncans currently in use - In Les Pauls: Custom(b)/Jazz(n), Distortion(b)/Jazz(n), '59(b)/'59(n) w/A4 mag, P-Rails(b)/P-Rails(n); In a Bullet S-3: P-Rails(b)/stock/Vintage Stack Tele(n); In a Dot: Seth Lover(b)/Seth Lover(n); In a Del Mar: Mag Mic; In a Lead II: Custom Shop Fender X-1(b)

              Comment


              • #8
                It's also worth mentioning that in certain cases adding more springs can be counterproductive (due to Hooke's law I think, but don't quote me on that and may give rise to tuning problems. That is because adding more springs may make the bridge feel stiffer and keep the bridge floating, but the springs themselves will be less stretched, thus storing less energy and after diving it will not return to zero, but rather a tad bit flat. A slap on the bar to make it flutter returns everything to zero in that case, but not a desirable situation. I would go for stronger springs ( I've had success with the red ones from FR, but FU-Tones and many other make similar products). Those will feel stiffer too but will be considerably more stretched when set up, thus storing more energy to pull the bridge back to zero.

                The gadget I reviewed in the thread I linked in my previous post aids the springs in doing their work: it pushes and pulls on the block at the same time thus maintaining the zero position. As an added bonus, strings wont go immediately flat when you bend one and supposedly a drop tuning on the fly is possible too. I'd try something similar, because it helps negate some of the drawbacks of the Floyd while letting it be a Floyd. You only sacrifice the flutters. I think if you have it is worth learning to use it. Now that you have why prevent it from doing what it was designed to do?

                Comment


                • #9
                  If your trem isn't going back to zero point, the knife edges are likely worn. I have several floyd guitars with 5 springs and no issue at all getting back to tune.
                  Join me in the fight against muscular atrophy!

                  Originally posted by Douglas Adams
                  This planet has - or rather had - a problem, which was this: most of the people living on it were unhappy for pretty much of the time. Many solutions were suggested for this problem, but most of these were largely concerned with the movements of small green pieces of paper, which is odd because on the whole it wasn't the small green pieces of paper that were unhappy.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by GuitarStv View Post
                    If your trem isn't going back to zero point, the knife edges are likely worn. I have several floyd guitars with 5 springs and no issue at all getting back to tune.
                    Yep, likely scenario, but not the only only reson for returning flat. I have one with 5 springs too, but the length of the cavity is a factor here I think. Either way, it is my experience that in some cases adding extra springs doesn't solve the issue but using stronber/shorter ones does. I just did one recently, where 4 springs didn't work well, but 3 stronger ones did.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by nexion218 View Post

                      Yep, likely scenario, but not the only only reson for returning flat. I have one with 5 springs too, but the length of the cavity is a factor here I think. Either way, it is my experience that in some cases adding extra springs doesn't solve the issue but using stronber/shorter ones does. I just did one recently, where 4 springs didn't work well, but 3 stronger ones did.
                      Weird. I suppose that's possible.

                      FWIW - I've found that using a mix of different lengths and/or tensions of springs seems to give me better stability while floating for some reason, so usually do that when setting up . . . but I'm not 100% sure if it's not all in my head. :P
                      Join me in the fight against muscular atrophy!

                      Originally posted by Douglas Adams
                      This planet has - or rather had - a problem, which was this: most of the people living on it were unhappy for pretty much of the time. Many solutions were suggested for this problem, but most of these were largely concerned with the movements of small green pieces of paper, which is odd because on the whole it wasn't the small green pieces of paper that were unhappy.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by GuitarStv View Post

                        Weird. I suppose that's possible.

                        FWIW - I've found that using a mix of different lengths and/or tensions of springs seems to give me better stability while floating for some reason, so usually do that when setting up . . . but I'm not 100% sure if it's not all in my head. :P
                        Nope, its not! Or at least we have it both in our heads then. I have one with 2 springs, but in that one I can drive the claw back far enough to create enough tension with only two springs. That's why I think that somehow the cavity, or more precisely the block-claw distance somehow plays a role.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          If you don't like it floating just weld the blade edge to the posts
                          If I only had a dollar for every song I've sung
                          every time I had to play while people sat there drunk,

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            JamesPaul dive-bombed onto a good point, that it takes a bit of time to adapt to the overall lighter touch required with an OFR/Edge type bridge.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              If you like the stuff you can do with it, keep it that way. Do you really want all your guitars set up to do all the same things? What would be the point of having multiples? I like a free-floating trem, but not on all my guitars. I like a decked trem, but not on all my guitars. I like a wraparound LP Special bridge, but not on all my guitars. Etc, etc.
                              Nobody knows, dude. Nobody knows.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X