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V bracing on Taylor acoustics guitars and strumming

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  • #16
    Originally posted by treyhaislip View Post

    Its funny, I always thought of the Taylors 600s as bright and amazing articulation–but Taylor describes the modern version as "our maple guitars have been revoiced and paired with specially seasoned spruce to produce a richer, warmer sound."

    So maybe I'm not the best source. lol That being said, I still typically think of a Maple back and side acoustic as being on the bright end.

    I still think you should check out some Taylors, to my ears they tend to be brighter, but would also recommend Takamine as they have some great sounding acoustics that probably won't break the bank.
    Not worried so much about the bank atm. Given the current inflation curve, I'd rather spend now than wait another 20 years.

    Sent from my SM-A115A using Tapatalk

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Demanic View Post
      Well, the Taylor is back in consideration. I like bright.

      Sent from my SM-A115A using Tapatalk
      I’ll add that my Taylor at least, is very balanced. Meaning that all of the strings ring out the same volume-wise.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by treyhaislip View Post

        Its funny, I always thought of the Taylors 600s as bright and amazing articulation–but Taylor describes the modern version as "our maple guitars have been revoiced and paired with specially seasoned spruce to produce a richer, warmer sound."

        So maybe I'm not the best source. lol That being said, I still typically think of a Maple back and side acoustic as being on the bright end.

        I still think you should check out some Taylors, to my ears they tend to be brighter, but would also recommend Takamine as they have some great sounding acoustics that probably won't break the bank.
        I’ll add Breedlove to the list as well. A buddy just bought one for around $200 and it’s a great looking, sounding and playing guitar at that price. At any price, for that matter.

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        • #19
          In my experience you really have to find one you bond with no matter the playing style and brand. If you have to buy blind, Taylor is a safe bet. They have great consistency from one to the other. Other brands, not as much. For a big box strummer I have to admit that I like my Gibson SJ-200 the most.
          The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side.

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          • #20
            What happens with a small bodied guitar and heavy strumming? I don't own any....
            Originally posted by Bad City
            He's got the crowd on his side and the blue jean lights in his eyes...

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Aceman View Post
              What happens with a small bodied guitar and heavy strumming? I don't own any....
              Size of the instrument just changes the tone. The loudest, punchiest guitar I've ever played was a 1929 Washburn parlor guitar. It was all dried out and very light, like a violin. Speaking of, I had to do a duet with a violinist once and her violin was ear piercingly loud and punchy compared to my jumbo acoustic.

              IME, to over generalize, Taylors are best for being the only accompaniment, Martins are best for being the lead accompaniment in a band or combo mix (though Taylor and Martin do work both ways, either solo or in a mix, but they need to be up front; they disappear unevenly back in the mix a bit), Gibsons are mid-heavy and punchy and best at mixing with electric guitars and a full band.
              Last edited by beaubrummels; 02-08-2022, 09:06 AM.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Aceman View Post
                What happens with a small bodied guitar and heavy strumming? I don't own any....
                Most of the smaller bodied acoustics seem like they hit a point with medium strumming where the top just doesn't have any more sound to give. On the bigger bodied guitars it usually takes a bit more oomph to get the top humming, but there's also a little bit wider dynamic range - you hit it harder and it keeps getting louder. That's not always a good thing. For fingerstyle stuff, that kind of natural compression of smaller bodied guitars can be a lot nicer.

                This is a generalization, and not true in all cases . . . but seems to happen more often than not for me.
                Join me in the fight against muscular atrophy!

                Originally posted by Douglas Adams
                This planet has - or rather had - a problem, which was this: most of the people living on it were unhappy for pretty much of the time. Many solutions were suggested for this problem, but most of these were largely concerned with the movements of small green pieces of paper, which is odd because on the whole it wasn't the small green pieces of paper that were unhappy.

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                • #23
                  Taylors always had amazing string-to-string clarity vs the 'wall of sound' coming off of a Martin.
                  Administrator of the SDUGF

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Bogner View Post
                    For a big box strummer I have to admit that I like my Gibson SJ-200 the most.
                    One of my favorite instruments ever is my dad’s old 60’s SJ. It’s the only guitar I own that makes my wife comment on how nice it sounds.
                    “I can play the hell out of a riff. The rest of it’s all bulls**t anyway,” Gary Holt

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                    • #25
                      Just got my Taylor 714CE (V Bracing and Grand Auditorium body) with a Western Cedar Top and after playing multiple older 714CE's (that had Cedar tops) that the V Bracing makes a significant impact on sustain.

                      To the OP, my 714 is definitely stronger on the fingerstyle end of playing than strumming–might be the Cedar Top but if you are wanting a strummer I would look to something like a Martin D18/D28 or a Gibson J45/Hummingbird...putting a Guild D50 as a good option as well.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by treyhaislip View Post
                        Just got my Taylor 714CE (V Bracing and Grand Auditorium body) with a Western Cedar Top and after playing multiple older 714CE's (that had Cedar tops) that the V Bracing makes a significant impact on sustain.

                        To the OP, my 714 is definitely stronger on the fingerstyle end of playing than strumming–might be the Cedar Top but if you are wanting a strummer I would look to something like a Martin D18/D28 or a Gibson J45/Hummingbird...putting a Guild D50 as a good option as well.
                        Pretty!

                        The cedar topped guitars that I've played tend to work better for fingerstyle. Might be the top.
                        Join me in the fight against muscular atrophy!

                        Originally posted by Douglas Adams
                        This planet has - or rather had - a problem, which was this: most of the people living on it were unhappy for pretty much of the time. Many solutions were suggested for this problem, but most of these were largely concerned with the movements of small green pieces of paper, which is odd because on the whole it wasn't the small green pieces of paper that were unhappy.

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