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  • Suppressing preamp noise...

    Hi there,

    I'm very happy with my NS2 doing the X pattern when running the amp clean, but I'm having some noise problems when running the preamp dirty (which is 90% of the time in my case).

    So, I was wondering if a second NS2 would solve this issue.


    That's my setup at the moment:

    guitar > NS2 input > OC (from NS2 send) > compressor > wha > OD > dist. > NS2 return > amp input > amp FX loop send >time based effects > amp FX loop return > power > cab

    It works fine when I'm only using pedals distortion with the amp clean, as I said... but with the amp saturated...


    My question is: would a second NS2 help me get rid of the amp hiss? If yes, where should I place it? After the FX loop send before time based effects?


    I was also thinking if it would work like that (didn't try yet), using only one NS2:

    guitar > NS2 input > OC (from NS2 send) > comp. > wah > OD > dist. > amp input > FX loop send > NS2 return > time based effects > FX loop return > etc.

    In other words, everything that is noisy inside the NS2 loop, including the amp overdriven preamp and its FX loop.


    Thanks a lot
    Cheers

  • #2
    Re: Suppressing preamp noise...

    I've had this problem before when initially buying my 6505+. I forked out the money and had the lead channel modded so its silent. No more extra noise gates and humming/buzzing between songs or during stops/pauses!!

    If you're going to have two noise gates though you need one in the loop of the amp and one in front of the amp (after the guitar).
    DeadandBuried
    Toneologist
    Last edited by DeadandBuried; 02-16-2016, 07:32 AM.

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    • #3
      Re: Suppressing preamp noise...

      Try using low noise/high gain preamp tubes like EHX. That should address the noisy preamp issue. See how noisy that sounds without plugging any pedals in. That is your base noise level.

      Also...you can try an old skool noise gate the the ones boss used to make at the end of your pedal chain. They work remarkably well and should address the noisy pedal issue.

      Make sure the pedals you are using don't suffer too badly from signal loss or loading (the wah is a likely culprit) and preferably true bypass. The less stuff in your signal path means a stronger signal to noise ratio. Currently your guitar signal could potentially be going through 5 buffers of varying quality, all sucking your signal a little and adding some noise, making quite a cumulative effect by the time it makes it to the amp. The ns2 or a noise gate should be all the buffering you need. Having a row of them is redundant.

      Same goes for anything you put in the loop. Also for pedals in the loop, make sure that the impedances are compatible with being in a loop. Again, less stuff and gear that is high quality will reduce noise.

      Also a basic rule of thumb is that high gain means higher noise level, and running high gain into high gain means noise is inevitable. Compression also adds noise. Try to reduce the sources of compression in your chain ie...if you are using your dirty channel on your amp especially if it is really dirty, a distortion pedal will not add much in terms of sustain but it will add noise and reduce definition. Adding compression on top of that is really just overkill. It might seem basic, but see if you can get by with less sources of compression or dirt and possibly consider reducing the amount of dirt you are using. This might seem less comfortable at first if you are used to endless sustain and bite, but with time you will find the musical benefits of having a lot more dynamic range in your playing which will in turn make what you play much more expressive and aggressive.
      Chickenwings
      Alnico 6/8
      Last edited by Chickenwings; 02-15-2016, 09:48 PM.
      "Technique is really the elimination of the unneccessary ... it is a constant effort to avoid any personal impediment or obstacle to acheive the smooth flow of energy and intent"
      Yehudi Menuhin

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      • #4
        Re: Suppressing preamp noise...

        Originally posted by lucaspaço View Post
        guitar > NS2 input > OC (from NS2 send) > comp. > wah > OD > dist. > amp input > FX loop send > NS2 return > time based effects > FX loop return > etc.
        This
        Who took my guitar?

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        • #5
          Re: Suppressing preamp noise...

          Originally posted by gibson175 View Post
          Try using low noise/high gain preamp tubes like EHX. That should address the noisy preamp issue. See how noisy that sounds without plugging any pedals in. That is your base noise level.

          Also...you can try an old skool noise gate the the ones boss used to make at the end of your pedal chain. They work remarkably well and should address the noisy pedal issue.

          Make sure the pedals you are using don't suffer too badly from signal loss or loading (the wah is a likely culprit) and preferably true bypass. The less stuff in your signal path means a stronger signal to noise ratio. Currently your guitar signal could potentially be going through 5 buffers of varying quality, all sucking your signal a little and adding some noise, making quite a cumulative effect by the time it makes it to the amp. The ns2 or a noise gate should be all the buffering you need. Having a row of them is redundant.

          Same goes for anything you put in the loop. Also for pedals in the loop, make sure that the impedances are compatible with being in a loop. Again, less stuff and gear that is high quality will reduce noise.

          Also a basic rule of thumb is that high gain means higher noise level, and running high gain into high gain means noise is inevitable. Compression also adds noise. Try to reduce the sources of compression in your chain ie...if you are using your dirty channel on your amp especially if it is really dirty, a distortion pedal will not add much in terms of sustain but it will add noise and reduce definition. Adding compression on top of that is really just overkill. It might seem basic, but see if you can get by with less sources of compression or dirt and possibly consider reducing the amount of dirt you are using. This might seem less comfortable at first if you are used to endless sustain and bite, but with time you will find the musical benefits of having a lot more dynamic range in your playing which will in turn make what you play much more expressive and aggressive.
          Thanks man!!
          I have one OD and one Dist. because sometimes I play in SS amps (studios and so on). But when playing with my tube amp I use only the OD as a boost. The compressor is always on, but with the sensitivity and 8 o'clock tops.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Suppressing preamp noise...

            Originally posted by IMENATOR View Post
            This
            Tried this recently and it does work really!!

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