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Pedals for fattening sound

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  • #16
    Re: Pedals for fattening sound

    Thanks for all the input so far. Just as a quick response to what some of you said, bass player is already playing with overdrive/fuzz on, as well as playing through an amp that has somewhat of an overdrive channel itself. We downtune to C anyway so there's plenty of bottom to go around.
    I don't really think I want to go for an overdrive pedal, I already have more gain than I can make use of in the 5153. I will, however, swap the Orange Cab for a matching EVH as soon as I get the chance, as the two really don't work well together.
    --------------------------------------------------------
    1973 Aria 551
    1984 Larrivee RS-4 w/ EMG SA/SA/89
    1989 Charvel 750 XL w/ DMZ Tone Zone & Air Norton
    1990's noname crap-o-caster plywood P/J Bass
    1991 Heartfield Elan III w/ DMZ mystery pups
    1995 Aria Pro II TA-65
    2001 Gibson Les Paul Gothic w/ PG-1 & SH-8

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    • #17
      Re: Pedals for fattening sound

      http://www.premierguitar.com/article...double-tracker

      Check out the Keeley Double Tracker, awesome for fattening things up, love mine.

      The other suggestions have been great also....

      Good Luck....


      AlleeCat

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      • #18
        Re: Pedals for fattening sound

        I play in a three piece setting most of the time myself. I use a Red Coral Dual Detune Pedal to fatten things up especially on rhythms. I also do something similar with my Eventide Pitchfactor where I slightly detune but that is a more expensive option.


        http://digitech.com/en-US/products/red-coral


        | Gear Reviews | Beer | Babes | The Internet's Only Unedited & Uncensored Musician's Forum | Sports |

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        • #19
          Re: Pedals for fattening sound

          Cool thread. Being the only guitarist in my band, and we play very heavy hard rock, I:
          -Use two cabs, one on each side of the stage
          -Octave shapes in guitar melodies often

          -Often use an analog delay set with a fairly close slapback, and then my digital delay over it
          -Custom string set, w/ 9.5 on top since I'm playing leads, and 48 on the bottom (in between traditional 10s and 11s low e size)
          -A dedicated buffer in my pedalboard!!! A row of TB pedals are great, but only with a nice buffer, otherwise your tone gets anemic
          -Fair amount of mids
          And I hit the strings like a mofo! Pretty heavy handed, and I didn't used to be. It came out of subconscious necessity.

          edit- Chorus too... but only if the song permits. I honestly don't find it necessary after all of the above happens.
          HALENisking
          Ultimate Tone Member
          Last edited by HALENisking; 03-09-2016, 03:11 PM.
          Within the glow that weaves a cloak of delight ... There moves a thread that has no end
          Yours is the cloth, mine is the hand that sews time ... For me, the cloth once more to spin
          At last the arm is straight, the hand to the loom ... Is this to end or just begin?

          sigpic My guitars + better pics

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          • #20
            Re: Pedals for fattening sound

            Wow - opinions vary here. My take - I can't tell what you mean by "thin/thick"

            If you mean a fatter sounding note, I'm thinking less treble. Turn the guitar tone known down, or do like EVH and get a Custom Custom.

            If you mean a "thicker" not - a delay ABSOLUTELY works.
            Simple thicker = set the delay to ~50ms with one repeat. Level is key here - it needs to be low enough you don't really hear the delay!
            Alternate version = slight detune or chorus. By the way - chorus IS a slight delay.

            You could do both…


            As mentioned, as a solo guitar player, you'll get away with less BS type of shreddy stuff.
            Originally posted by Bad City
            He's got the crowd on his side and the blue jean lights in his eyes...

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            • #21
              Re: Pedals for fattening sound

              I'm invisioning the tone of some Pantera songs where Dime solos and there's no rhythm guitar. Rex banging away on the low string, Dime up at the 15th fret and nothing in the middle.

              Is that what you mean by the band sounding thin?
              Oh no.....


              Oh Yeah!

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              • #22
                Re: Pedals for fattening sound

                Originally posted by PFDarkside View Post
                I'm invisioning the tone of some Pantera songs where Dime solos and there's no rhythm guitar. Rex banging away on the low string, Dime up at the 15th fret and nothing in the middle.

                Is that what you mean by the band sounding thin?
                Yeah, something akin to that. Pantera pulled it off gracefully. Me, not so much :P
                --------------------------------------------------------
                1973 Aria 551
                1984 Larrivee RS-4 w/ EMG SA/SA/89
                1989 Charvel 750 XL w/ DMZ Tone Zone & Air Norton
                1990's noname crap-o-caster plywood P/J Bass
                1991 Heartfield Elan III w/ DMZ mystery pups
                1995 Aria Pro II TA-65
                2001 Gibson Les Paul Gothic w/ PG-1 & SH-8

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: Pedals for fattening sound

                  Originally posted by Coma View Post
                  Second guitarist in my band quit and I need to fatten up my sound for live gigs. Esp solos sound thin now that there's no rhythm guitar to back things up.
                  Effects aren't going to compensate for the way your band's songs are composed.
                  A few ideas for going on as a band with just one guitarist:
                  1.) Your bassist could play keyboards while you solo, allowing him to cover both bass and chords.
                  2.) Your bassist could play a 12 or 8 string bass, or play through a pitch shift pedal adding an octave up, to sort of provide something in the frequency range of a rhythm guitar and also the low end.
                  3.) You can play the riff you're going to solo over into a looper, then solo over it. You have to figure out how to keep your other band members playing in time to the loop.
                  4.) You can recompose your songs, removing the solos and replacing them with instrumental sections ("breakdowns", whatever you want to call them) where instead of soloing, you play a cool and attention-grabbing riff that's different from riffs already used in other parts of the song.

                  Using a combination of the above ideas in various songs might give the band a really interesting sound.
                  "Just like bad gas, they (metal riffs) sneak out every once in a while."
                  Jah Paul Jo - Dread Zeppelin
                  guitar pic site
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                  • #24
                    Re: Pedals for fattening sound

                    Another idea: guitarists like Charlie Hunter have developed technique to be able to accompany themselves, playing chords and melody lines at the same time. Stanley Jordan did so using both hands on the fretboard, Hunter using just one, and Michael Hedges on acoustic using a combination of techniques.
                    Some of these guitarists had special instruments built for them with separate pickups for the bass strings wired to separate outputs so different parts they were playing went to different amps.

                    It's a sizeable commitment in technique, composition and gear, and not something most guitarists can justify, but this is a brainstorming session. Any idea can be put out there, right?
                    "Just like bad gas, they (metal riffs) sneak out every once in a while."
                    Jah Paul Jo - Dread Zeppelin
                    guitar pic site
                    Original prog rock on soundcloud
                    Original ambient guitar pieces on soundcloud
                    Original blues on soundcloud.com

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                    • #25
                      Re: Pedals for fattening sound

                      Originally posted by Coma View Post
                      Yeah, something akin to that. Pantera pulled it off gracefully. Me, not so much :P
                      I'm going to say that Pantera didn't exactly pull it off. I think the key may be threefold:
                      -Have the bassist play double stops and power chords to fill out the sonic space, as well as play higher on the neck
                      -Play your solos in the "meat" of the neck, positions 5 through 9 as opposed to above the 12th, at least for a good portion until you go high to make a statement
                      -Boost Pedal. When you go from chord rhythm to single note lead, you are reducing the amount of signal that hits the Amp, and by nature will sound less full. A Tube Screamer style boost will allow you to hit the amp at least as hard as your rhythm playing, and boost mids to make the tone more full and juicy. The TS in front of a distorted Amp has been a classic lead trick for heavy rock and metal for years now.
                      Oh no.....


                      Oh Yeah!

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                      • #26
                        Re: Pedals for fattening sound

                        I would start by having the bass player play hard and heavy on either power chords or very busy basslines during leads during solos, preferable with a octave fuzz. A doubled octave above the bass will sound more like another rhythm guitar, which will really fill out during solos. Also, EQ. The bass should have a lot of lows and low mids, with the guitar somewhat above that frequency pocket. Don't stomp on each other's sonic space, but just the right amount of overlap in the midrange will sound huge/powerful.

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                        • #27
                          Re: Pedals for fattening sound

                          I use a very slight de-tune,FWIW...
                          "Scalloped & Stickered"
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                          • #28
                            Re: Pedals for fattening sound

                            Originally posted by Coma View Post
                            Yeah, something akin to that. Pantera pulled it off gracefully. Me, not so much :P
                            Play it like you mean it!


                            Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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                            • #29
                              Re: Pedals for fattening sound

                              I occasionally use delay to thicken tones, the 2 'tricks' I utilise is to use as a short a delay as possible, set your delay up with one short repeat and play a barre chord, muting it with your fretting hand and adjust the time until you hear it go 'chik chik' with the delayed part practically instantaneous after the played part, when you play without muting you won't hear the delayed part it will merge with the original seamlessly and almost double the sound.
                              The 2nd is only possible if you have an analog delay, there's an oscillating effect you get with short delay and high repeat values, play around with it and you'll find the sweet spot which gives you an incredible feedback/infinite sustain effect which is incredible for solos.
                              If you use a long ethereal delay to thicken tone it just makes a mess and sounds like a ***tty reverb
                              Also bear in mind gain is the enemy of fat guitar sounds and mids are it's best friend
                              regan
                              Toneologist
                              Last edited by regan; 03-16-2016, 12:26 PM.

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                              • #30
                                Re: Pedals for fattening sound

                                Originally posted by Matt42 View Post
                                The biggest thing to keeping things sounding full in a three piece is technique, you'll have to adjust your playing to compensate.
                                You're getting great advice about delays, and I have to agree with Matt here, and would add that you'll also need your rhythm section (presuming bass and drums) to think about their role in thickening the overall arrangement.

                                On a side note, playing "out in the open" can add a layer of vulnerability/exposure, especially if you're used to burying mistakes/insecurity in a "wall of sound" approach. It's like playing ultra-clean without OD/distortion - note-choice and intention becomes really, really important (one of the reasons many who try to go David Gilmour completely miss the mark - he underplays much more than folk think, but when he plays...)

                                Best of luck.




                                Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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