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    Demanic
    PenultimateTone Member

  • Demanic
    replied
    Re: noise gate

    I think that I'm going to look into an ISP II G.

    Sent from my MotoE2(4G-LTE) using Tapatalk

    Leave a comment:

  • MkIII Renegade
    Toneologist

  • MkIII Renegade
    replied
    Re: noise gate

    Originally posted by MrFlexx View Post
    I use the MXR Smart Gate and it does the job really well. Before going all pedals I had a rack system loaded with stuff and then I used the Rocktron Hush IICX (one of the most famous gates of all times) and the MXR Smart Gate does the job just as good.
    You definitely have to turn it off for good clean sounds, but the Smartgate on full tilt is BRILLIANT for high gain tones!

    Leave a comment:

  • mwalluk
    Mojo's Minions

  • mwalluk
    replied
    Re: noise gate

    isp or tc sentry

    Leave a comment:


  • MrFlexx
    replied
    Re: noise gate

    I use the MXR Smart Gate and it does the job really well. Before going all pedals I had a rack system loaded with stuff and then I used the Rocktron Hush IICX (one of the most famous gates of all times) and the MXR Smart Gate does the job just as good.

    Leave a comment:

  • DeadandBuried
    Ultimate Tone Member

  • DeadandBuried
    replied
    Re: noise gate

    Depends where you want to eliminate the noise from, pre-amp, FX loop, etc.

    I have the ISP Decimator and it works superbly well as well as the NS-2.

    Leave a comment:

  • Van Noord
    Mojo's Minions

  • Van Noord
    replied
    Re: noise gate

    I own both an NS2 and ISP Decimator and I found the NS2 to work better in the effects loop of my JSX hooked up in an x pattern cable method.
    The Decimator works really well up front. I use that one with my JVM. One thing about the "tone suck" of the NS2 is that it's more of a edge/presence duller or signal softener effect. But it goes away I find with increased playing volume, but the effect can be noticeable moreso at lower volume levels. The amount of it, and how noticable it is can vary amp to amp and signal chain to signal chain.
    When in the x pattern I found the NS2 actually slightly boosted my tone's presence and clairity.
    My use of these are mainly to eliminate operating noise and hiss with rather conservative gate settings. Although they both handle high volume feedback​ very well too.
    Van Noord
    Mojo's Minions
    Last edited by Van Noord; 04-24-2017, 11:56 AM.

    Leave a comment:

  • bluesfloyd
    Tone Member

  • bluesfloyd
    replied
    Re: noise gate

    Originally posted by MkIII Renegade View Post
    The Smart Gate definitely needs to be in the loop; works much better that way.

    It does an amazing job of taming high gain WITHOUT sucking your tone away. I've heard the NS-2 does suck tone, which I can't accept.
    hi, MkIII Renegade
    just checking, when you say ( The Smart Gate definitely needs to be in the loop) you mean the effect loop from the amp yes/no ????
    or do you mean making a loop on the pedal board to and from the smart gate, placing the pedals that are making the most noise in that loop ????

    thanks for your time,
    bluesfloyd,
    bluesfloyd
    Tone Member
    Last edited by bluesfloyd; 04-24-2017, 11:21 AM.

    Leave a comment:

  • allstarrme
    Toneologist

  • allstarrme
    replied
    Re: noise gate

    Originally posted by Obsessive Compulsive View Post
    Yes that's true. But when you play that noise is present again. So it's useless. Why not roll off the volume knob?

    I am talking about a device that removes the noise entirely from the signal, kinda like that noise filtering feature in a recording software that takes a sample of certain frequencies (the noise) then removes them.

    If the noise is caused by ground loops, the solution is grounding the whole system using a metal rod buried into the ground, connected to an idle jack behind the amp. That's true noise filtering.
    Most noise is quieter than what you are playing and almost undetectable , at least to an audience during performance.

    The solution to ground loops is not to ground your rig better but to use a 1 to 1 transformer that removes any interference picked up by the ground.

    If your rig is quiet enough you won't even need a noise pedal, but finding the source of the noise involves plugging in one piece at a time and seeing when and where noise is introduced into the system.

    Leave a comment:

  • Rex_Rocker
    Ultimate Tone Slacker

  • Rex_Rocker
    replied
    Re: noise gate

    I've got an ISP Decimator. Works great. Would love to try the version 2.

    A buddy of mine has the EHX Silencer. It's ok, but it takes a bit longer to close than the Decimator.

    Leave a comment:

  • IMENATOR
    Ultimate Tone Slacker

  • IMENATOR
    replied
    Re: noise gate

    Originally posted by Obsessive Compulsive View Post
    How is a noise gate supposed to remove the noise? It's a gate that keeps low db signals out. When you start playing the gate will open and there is that noise again.

    What you need is a noise filter that works like baking soda, removing the noise entirely. But I don't know if such thing exists. Does Rocktron Hush work like that?
    Every rig is different and electrical installations too, that can bring different levels or kinds of noises. Noise gates are based on the idea that when you play the guitar its sound will mask the noise and it won't really be heard. If your noise cannot be heard when the noise gate opens then you are ok, if not then you are dealing with an insane amount of noise that really needs you to take other actions: Poor quality cables, poorly designed and too noisy pedals/amps, lack of proper electrical grounding, ground loops caused by pedal powered in daisy chain, noise at the electrical power source, electromagnetic interference... and true single coils over high gain of course.

    I agree a noise filter can help, I am personally looking to get myself EB Tech's HumX to try to remove the noise coming from the electrical outlet, and EB Tech's Hum Eliminator to avoid ground loop specially between my laptom and amp DI connection, all this for a more silent home recording.

    Leave a comment:

  • redbullnshimano
    Junior Member

  • redbullnshimano
    replied
    Re: noise gate

    [QUOTE=I am talking about a device that removes the noise entirely from the signal, kinda like that noise filtering feature in a recording software that takes a sample of certain frequencies (the noise) then removes them.[/QUOTE]

    That sounds more like a digital sampler to me.

    Leave a comment:

  • Obsessive Compulsive
    Super Toneologist

  • Obsessive Compulsive
    replied
    Re: noise gate

    Originally posted by allstarrme View Post
    Most gates cut off the hum and buzz when you aren't playing, anything from stopping feedback to hard gating in short palm muted parts.

    Some of the causes of hum are high gain and cheap components, but also the are unshielded cables, ground loops, interference picked up by racks, noisy guitars and other components.

    To really quiet the noise every aspect of the amp, effects, cables and guitar should be investigated. A noise gate can be a bandaid on other problems in a noisy setup. In an optimized rig though it can be used much more sparingly and still help.

    I am building a setup now with an isolated power distribution, balanced send and return cables, wireless inputs, very short cable connections, rack isolator tabs and quiet humbucking guitars. It still has a buzz on the distortion channel but that's what the gate is for.
    Yes that's true. But when you play that noise is present again. So it's useless. Why not roll off the volume knob?

    I am talking about a device that removes the noise entirely from the signal, kinda like that noise filtering feature in a recording software that takes a sample of certain frequencies (the noise) then removes them.

    If the noise is caused by ground loops, the solution is grounding the whole system using a metal rod buried into the ground, connected to an idle jack behind the amp. That's true noise filtering.
    Obsessive Compulsive
    Super Toneologist
    Last edited by Obsessive Compulsive; 04-16-2017, 12:19 AM.

    Leave a comment:

  • allstarrme
    Toneologist

  • allstarrme
    replied
    Re: noise gate

    Most gates cut off the hum and buzz when you aren't playing, anything from stopping feedback to hard gating in short palm muted parts.

    Some of the causes of hum are high gain and cheap components, but also the are unshielded cables, ground loops, interference picked up by racks, noisy guitars and other components.

    To really quiet the noise every aspect of the amp, effects, cables and guitar should be investigated. A noise gate can be a bandaid on other problems in a noisy setup. In an optimized rig though it can be used much more sparingly and still help.

    I am building a setup now with an isolated power distribution, balanced send and return cables, wireless inputs, very short cable connections, rack isolator tabs and quiet humbucking guitars. It still has a buzz on the distortion channel but that's what the gate is for.

    Leave a comment:

  • Obsessive Compulsive
    Super Toneologist

  • Obsessive Compulsive
    replied
    Re: noise gate

    How is a noise gate supposed to remove the noise? It's a gate that keeps low db signals out. When you start playing the gate will open and there is that noise again.

    What you need is a noise filter that works like baking soda, removing the noise entirely. But I don't know if such thing exists. Does Rocktron Hush work like that?

    Leave a comment:

  • Aceman
    less mild old man perv

  • Aceman
    replied
    Re: noise gate

    I just got an EHX Silencer

    I really dig the three knob control

    Leave a comment:

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