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  • Compressor Pedal Review

    Wife got me the JHS Series 3 Compressor for Christmas and I really like it.

    I wanted a compressor because I felt that with my gear, notes (especially higher notes) were decaying just a little sooner than I wanted so I was looking to increase sustain.

    This pedal does that perfectly, so mission accomplished for what I wanted.

    But it is really well built (sturdy metal housing; not some cheap plastic junk), it's slightly smaller than a normal sized pedal but it's certainly not a mini. And it's made in the USA so you can't beat that.

    Plus these Series 3 pedals are all $99, so it's decently priced for a well made, brand new pedal.

    It also has a brightness switch that pushes up the mids and highs (with distortion or fuzz, it kinda gives you a Boston-ish sound). The brightness switch also sounds good on a clean tone if you are looking for that higher pitched sound.

    My only complaint is that it doesn't sound good on a clean tone; since it's 'compressing' the sound it really flattens out the clean tone quite a bit if you are not using the brightness switch, but hey, that's what its suppose to do.

    Anyway I give it a 5 of 5 because it (a) did exactly what I wanted, (b) it's well made, and (c) affordably priced.
    Last edited by Spirit of 76; 12-28-2020, 11:28 AM.

  • #2
    that series of pedals is great, glad you like the comp!

    Comment


    • #3
      Nice, I bet thats a winner.

      What I find to be the primary difference between the sub $100 and above $100/150ish compressors (until you get into the very high end pedal compressors where there are serval sonic differences/abilities -like a Greer Lamplighter or Origin Cali76) is the signal to noise ratio on the makeup gain output circuit... the cheaper compressors generally cannot be run above unity (sometimes even at unity) without adding inherent noise -like if you want a boost. whereas the most expensive ones are super quiet adding 5-10db above unity on the back end.

      Good news is most people only want unity through a compressor, so even the inexpensive ones will do the job pretty well.

      Because that pedals sits in the middle price point I'd be curious to know how the noise floor is if you boost above unity on output

      -because it's a JHS I suspect it's pretty good.
      “For me, when everything goes wrong – that’s when adventure starts.” Yvonne Chouinard

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      • #4
        Sounds like a Ross circuit. I like those, when they have some way of adding back in some lost highs.
        ---------------------------
        The most popular thread I've ever made was 1) a joke and 2) based around literally the most inane/mundane question I could think of. That says something about me, or all of you, or both.

        https://forum.seymourduncan.com/show...or-for-a-Strat

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        • #5
          Originally posted by jeremy View Post
          that series of pedals is great, glad you like the comp!
          Yes, I imagine the rest in the series are just as good. This is my second JHS pedal and I am really impressed with their overall quality and sound.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by NegativeEase View Post
            Nice, I bet thats a winner.

            What I find to be the primary difference between the sub $100 and above $100/150ish compressors (until you get into the very high end pedal compressors where there are serval sonic differences/abilities -like a Greer Lamplighter or Origin Cali76) is the signal to noise ratio on the makeup gain output circuit... the cheaper compressors generally cannot be run above unity (sometimes even at unity) without adding inherent noise -like if you want a boost. whereas the most expensive ones are super quiet adding 5-10db above unity on the back end.

            Good news is most people only want unity through a compressor, so even the inexpensive ones will do the job pretty well.

            Because that pedals sits in the middle price point I'd be curious to know how the noise floor is if you boost above unity on output

            -because it's a JHS I suspect it's pretty good.
            So far, I haven't noticed any noise issues with this pedal but if I do I'll let you know.

            Comment


            • #7
              Nice. Been curious about the JHS stuff. I'm not in the market for a compressor but sounds like this one does the trick. I picked up a Keeley 4-knob Compressor earlier this year and love it. It's the only compressor that I've been happy with.

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              • #8
                They are all likely pretty good gear.

                Originally posted by Bad City
                He's got the crowd on his side and the blue jean lights in his eyes...

                Comment


                • #9
                  You know, if you turn that attack knob ALLLLLL the way to the right, it will let a lot of your attack slip through on clean.

                  You should have got a compressor with a Blend knob. Because you really wanted a sustainer, not a compressor.
                  Originally posted by Bad City
                  He's got the crowd on his side and the blue jean lights in his eyes...

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ErikH View Post
                    Nice. Been curious about the JHS stuff. I'm not in the market for a compressor but sounds like this one does the trick. I picked up a Keeley 4-knob Compressor earlier this year and love it. It's the only compressor that I've been happy with.
                    I have the JHS Muffuletta Fuzz and I really love one as well. I benched my EHX Big Muff Pi/Tone Wicker over it (and that EHX is a great sounding pedal in my opinion)

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Aceman View Post
                      You know, if you turn that attack knob ALLLLLL the way to the right, it will let a lot of your attack slip through on clean.

                      You should have got a compressor with a Blend knob. Because you really wanted a sustainer, not a compressor.
                      Ah I didn't know that (this is my first compressor). I had been reading a little bit and assumed a Sustainer and Compressor to be roughly the same thing.

                      Will try it out though,...Thanks!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Spirit of 76 View Post

                        Ah I didn't know that (this is my first compressor). I had been reading a little bit and assumed a Sustainer and Compressor to be roughly the same thing.

                        Will try it out though,...Thanks!
                        I was making a joke - but, since that is the case...yeah, do that. It may still compress, but it will be a lot longer before it kicks in, and if the note envelope has quieted down enough from the initial attack, you may notice much much less compression.
                        Originally posted by Bad City
                        He's got the crowd on his side and the blue jean lights in his eyes...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I have always wondered which direction to turn the attack knob to to allow the most attack to be heard.

                          Sent from my SM-A115A using Tapatalk

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                          • #14
                            Usually - left means fast (as in starts quickly) and right means slow (as in starts compressing later.
                            Originally posted by Bad City
                            He's got the crowd on his side and the blue jean lights in his eyes...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Aceman View Post
                              Usually - left means fast (as in starts quickly) and right means slow (as in starts compressing later.
                              Excellent.
                              For years I'd thought the opposite and wondered why I couldn't dial in what I wanted.
                              Sent from my SM-A115A using Tapatalk


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