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FZ-2 Clone other than Behringer?

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  • #16
    the muff has always been classified as a fuzz as far as i know, at least by whoever classifies these things, but there is plenty of crossover tonally between what is a "fuzz" and a "distortion". there are so many versions of a fuzzface or a big muff it gets ridiculous but i know what i like when i hear it! or what my slightly less old but deaf ears can still hear

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    • #17
      Rat is a crossover Distortion/Fuzz...
      Originally posted by Bad City
      He's got the crowd on his side and the blue jean lights in his eyes...

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Aceman View Post
        Rat is a crossover Distortion/Fuzz...
        "Rat" is what I was thinking when I read "Big Muff." I can't remember if I've even heard a Big Muff. I think I have one of the old 4-IC versions laying around here somewhere, that needs repair.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by ArtieToo View Post

          "Rat" is what I was thinking when I read "Big Muff." I can't remember if I've even heard a Big Muff. I think I have one of the old 4-IC versions laying around here somewhere, that needs repair.
          If that's the one they call op-amp muff then it's worth fixing if even just to sell. The op-muff reissue is the only muff I'll ever own, I just don't gel with traditional fuzzes.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by ArtieToo View Post
            My interest is piqued. What's the deal with an FZ-2? How is it different than most other fuzz's?
            Hard to explain, honestly. The FZ-2 is a bit more modern sounding than a lot of other fuzzes and holds up really well in a busier mix. It gets plenty deep and gritty, but stays tight with a nice octave effect and a good range of adjustability. It's a meaner sounding fuzz that borders on a distortion when pushed.

            I'm no circuit expert, but I find that fuzzes and overdrives/distortions can definitely have some overlap. The RAT is a good example. What distortions tend to lack is that "peeling velcro" (best I've heard it explained) feel and response that a lot of good fuzzes have. I find that fuzzes can really fill out a rhythm sound. While your typical overdrives and distortions are also useful for rhythms, they tend to hold up better with lead playing. Not that you can't use a fuzz for leads, it's just not as articulate and "singing" as a good overdrive/distortion can be, if that makes sense?

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