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Buttery, smooth, warm, fat ,thick?

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    kill your scene
    Tone Member

  • kill your scene
    replied
    Re: Buttery, smooth, warm, fat ,thick?

    All I know is that this thread's title is making me hungry for pancakes.

    Leave a comment:

  • jeremy
    LoveMachineologist

  • jeremy
    replied
    Re: Buttery, smooth, warm, fat ,thick?

    to me:
    buttery means a round sound with good sustain
    smooth means the high end isnt too strident or pronounced
    fat means a big tone without an abundance of high end
    thick means a very dense tone

    fat and thick are basically the same thing as far as im concerned

    Leave a comment:

  • MoodyBlue
    Tone Member

  • MoodyBlue
    replied
    Re: Buttery, smooth, warm, fat ,thick?

    Bump!

    Leave a comment:

  • MoodyBlue
    Tone Member

  • MoodyBlue
    replied
    Re: Buttery, smooth, warm, fat ,thick?

    Curly that would be a great Post for the vault! Hey moderators , can we get it back?!

    Jim

    Leave a comment:

  • Curly
    Moe's Bluesman

  • Curly
    replied
    Re: Buttery, smooth, warm, fat ,thick?

    actually, I think we've had similar posts from Gearjoneser and others, at least for amp terms for sure, in one of the former incarnations of the vault... that may have been one of the more helpful posts that went into the digital void.

    Leave a comment:

  • ArtieToo
    Peaveyologist

  • ArtieToo
    replied
    Re: Buttery, smooth, warm, fat ,thick?

    Just for the fun of it, here's how I would interpret these terms:

    Smooth: Fairly even frequency response, med to low output.
    Warm: A bit more mid-range, or "presense".
    Fat: Even frequency response, higher output.
    Thick: Higher output, perhaps leaning towards bass and midrange.

    Not sure about buttery, maybe just the more "poetic" version of smooth/warm.

    Leave a comment:

  • MoodyBlue
    Tone Member

  • MoodyBlue
    started a topic Buttery, smooth, warm, fat ,thick?

    Buttery, smooth, warm, fat ,thick?

    Ok this is gonna be one of those really dumb questions but we use these terms all the time and I wonder if my view of these sound descriptions is what is accurate! Can someone with good backround in this area give me some more detailed descriptions of these terms. In my head they're closely the same thing. But my pickup choices and how I describe them to others could be completely different if my views are off center.

    Thanks!

    Jim
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