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Replacing The Stock Humbucker On My Fat Strat?

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  • #46
    Originally posted by jeremy View Post
    usually if you touch a metal part and the hum goes away, there is a grounding issue somewhere.
    Appreciate the reply.

    Where is the grounding issue? I notice that if I touch the metal handle on the amp, the hum dissipates a bit as well (at times, not consistently).

    I did listen to some youtube video's of humming sounds that sound exactly like what I am hearing out of my amp; a couple of people said it's coming out of the house AC. I didn't know if that's true or not.

    Outside of the hum, the pickup sounds fantastic
    Last edited by newdorplane; 08-14-2020, 01:48 PM.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by Mincer View Post

      Let us know how this project turns out. Remember, that any Duncan humbucker will be naturally out of phase with your Fender single coils, so take that into consideration when wiring.
      Appreciate the reply.

      I have no idea as to what I was doing; I followed the SD wiring diagram as best I could.

      (EDIT: not wanting to waste anyone's time, I should mention that I am living in a temporary situation, and I don't have access to my sottering gun, etc., so for the time being, I spliced into the original wiring on the original humbucker pickup, wired the CC up, and I sealed it thoroughly with shrink tubing. The (bare) silver wire, and the green wire, off of the CC goes to the pot...correct? The bare silver wire is the sole ground...correct?)

      Thank you for your time
      Last edited by newdorplane; 08-14-2020, 02:46 PM.

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      • #48
        Okay...I have watched some video's, trying to get to the bottom of this.

        I dunno if this makes a difference or not, but the SD diagram shows that the black wire - only the black wire - should go to the five way pickup switch selector. When I did that, the pickup sounded a little weak (in volume), and the original humbucker had three wires going to the switch - so I wired the SD the same way; three wires go to the switch, and the bare gray and green get grounded at the pot.

        Everything works perfectly - the switch, the tone selector, etc

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        • #49
          If you have three wires going to the switch, you probably have it locked into perpetual split mode. Gently tap on each coil and hear if they both are active. I bet one is not.

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          • #50
            Originally posted by ArtieToo View Post
            If you have three wires going to the switch, you probably have it locked into perpetual split mode. Gently tap on each coil and hear if they both are active. I bet one is not.
            I appreciate your reply and information...thanks.

            ***

            Can it be that by twisting the wires together and shrink tubing them, I am not making a good enough ground?

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            • #51
              Well, bare should be soldered to ground. Red and white should be soldered together and taped or heat shrinked. I would definitely solder rather than twist. Then, either do green to ground and black to the switch. If it's out-of-phase with the other pups, then reverse black and green.

              I just reread your 1st post. If they're stock Fender pups, you almost certainly want to do black to ground and green to the switch, Bare and red/white stay the same.
              Last edited by ArtieToo; 08-15-2020, 12:44 PM.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by ArtieToo View Post
                Well, bare should be soldered to ground. Red and white should be soldered together and taped or heat shrinked. I would definitely solder rather than twist. Then, either do green to ground and black to the switch. If it's out-of-phase with the other pups, then reverse black and green.

                I just reread your 1st post. If they're stock Fender pups, you almost certainly want to do black to ground and green to the switch, Bare and red/white stay the same.
                Thank you for your time and helpful comments.

                Yes they're the stock Fender pickups...so ignore the SD color diagram; on my CC pickup, black to ground and green to switch? Would this be causing or exacerbating the humming that I am hearing?

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                • #53
                  It shouldn't. It remains humbucking wired either way.

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by ArtieToo View Post
                    It shouldn't. It remains humbucking wired either way.
                    Thanks so much...you've built up my knowledge.

                    I'll get my hands on a sottering iron, and update the thread with my findings.

                    Hopefully, sottering the ground to the pot will cure the hum...

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Keep in mind that the wiring in your house may be a factor.
                      I recently bought a house and the wiring is old school. My amps/guitars are noticeably noisier than in my last house.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Originally posted by Gtrjunior View Post
                        Keep in mind that the wiring in your house may be a factor.
                        I recently bought a house and the wiring is old school. My amps/guitars are noticeably noisier than in my last house.
                        I am running this in an almost new house, and the builder was pretty meticulous with electric, plumbing, etc

                        I did try other outlets, with no change.

                        I plan on sottering everything, and seeing what happens. Either way, I will update the thread with my findings.

                        ****

                        When sottering, can I put the tip of the sottering iron directly on the pot, heat the surface of the pot, and then touch the sotter onto the hot pot?

                        In other words, my question is: will I damage the pot if I heat the surface of the pot with a sottering iron?

                        Thanks

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                        • #57
                          Originally posted by newdorplane View Post

                          I am running this in an almost new house, and the builder was pretty meticulous with electric, plumbing, etc

                          I did try other outlets, with no change.

                          I plan on sottering everything, and seeing what happens. Either way, I will update the thread with my findings.

                          ****

                          When sottering, can I put the tip of the sottering iron directly on the pot, heat the surface of the pot, and then touch the sotter onto the hot pot?

                          In other words, my question is: will I damage the pot if I heat the surface of the pot with a sottering iron?

                          Thanks
                          What you described is how you do it. You won’t damage the pot.

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                          • #58
                            Originally posted by Gtrjunior View Post

                            What you described is how you do it. You won’t damage the pot.
                            Very helpful...thanks

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Originally posted by newdorplane View Post

                              I am running this in an almost new house, and the builder was pretty meticulous with electric, plumbing, etc

                              I did try other outlets, with no change.

                              I plan on sottering everything, and seeing what happens. Either way, I will update the thread with my findings.

                              ****

                              When sottering, can I put the tip of the sottering iron directly on the pot, heat the surface of the pot, and then touch the sotter onto the hot pot?

                              In other words, my question is: will I damage the pot if I heat the surface of the pot with a sottering iron?

                              Thanks
                              Environmental noise is real.

                              Certain appliances can cause line noise, especially ceiling fans or lamps with dimmers. Try turning them off, or better yet, get an extension cord and plug into different power zones in your house (on different breakers). You may find certain outlets have less noise. You may find that the noise varies based on time of day.

                              Noise can also be caused by proximity to computers.

                              There are various products designed to provide clean power or filter noise.

                              Ground loops are solved by a Hum Eliminator (or copy). Line noise can be solved with a Hum X or Trip Lite Isolator, or even a large enough UPS.

                              Then of course there is proper wiring and grounding in guitar.

                              As a guitarist you really need to learn all this. Get a ground loop isolator and HumX to keep in your bag. If you have a home studio fixed installation, a Trip Lite.

                              Also, there is noise radiated by your body. You sometimes will need to ground your body. You can do this by running a wire from the input ground of your amp and wrap it around your ankle (or some other scheme). This can be invaluable when recording.

                              So many tricks, you need to know them all. Noise does not mean there is a wiring problem in your guitar, in fact usually it is something else. If there is a guitar ground problem, when you touch the bridge or controls, the noise will not go away.


                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Originally posted by Top-L View Post

                                Environmental noise is real.

                                Certain appliances can cause line noise, especially ceiling fans or lamps with dimmers. Try turning them off, or better yet, get an extension cord and plug into different power zones in your house (on different breakers). You may find certain outlets have less noise. You may find that the noise varies based on time of day.

                                Noise can also be caused by proximity to computers.

                                There are various products designed to provide clean power or filter noise.

                                Ground loops are solved by a Hum Eliminator (or copy). Line noise can be solved with a Hum X or Trip Lite Isolator, or even a large enough UPS.

                                Then of course there is proper wiring and grounding in guitar.

                                As a guitarist you really need to learn all this. Get a ground loop isolator and HumX to keep in your bag. If you have a home studio fixed installation, a Trip Lite.

                                Also, there is noise radiated by your body. You sometimes will need to ground your body. You can do this by running a wire from the input ground of your amp and wrap it around your ankle (or some other scheme). This can be invaluable when recording.

                                So many tricks, you need to know them all. Noise does not mean there is a wiring problem in your guitar, in fact usually it is something else. If there is a guitar ground problem, when you touch the bridge or controls, the noise will not go away.

                                Good tips here.

                                Even a perfectly wired guitar is never 100% silent. Even with Humbuckers.

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