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  • Question about multimeter

    Just bought a multimeter and the directions aren't very clear as to my specific application, does anybody have a video link that will teach me how to test pickups,pots,and caps with a multimeter? If so please share. Thanks alot.
    It's funny how some stories became historic,
    especially when the authors clearly wrote them to be metaphoric,
    But people will believe anything when it's written in stone or ancient scroll...-Fat Mike

  • #2
    Connect it to something that you want to test and turn the switch until you find the setting that displays a relevant reading.
    Last edited by Clint 55; 07-31-2021, 01:35 PM.
    The things that you wanted
    I bought them for you

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    • #3
      In most cases the 20k ohms setting works.
      I get the feeling the A8 will blow your skirt up more so - Edgecrusher

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      • #4
        Yes, the 20k ohm setting, and the continuity setting are the ones I use the most.
        Dave, Ambassador/Writer/Artist for Seymour Duncan

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        • #5
          Posting a pic or a link or at least a make/model no. of your particular meter would be helpful.

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          • #6
            Hopefully you bought a digital one, much easier to read than the old analogue ones I grew up with. (Okay, when I was REALLY young we still measured things in pounds per square inch of steam and bushels of hay, but horse-drawn steam guitars are pretty rare these days, so...)

            The settings you will use most, on guitars anyway, will be the ohms settings. The ohms symbol is the Greek omega symbol, Google it, kind of like an upside down u or a right way up w.

            The 20k range is good for checking pickups. Their impedance is typically in the 5 to 15k ohms range.

            You'll need the highest one on there (probably) for checking pots. Pots have impedance starting, typically, at 250k ohms, going up to 1meg (1000k) ohms.

            Often the lowest one comes with a buzzer or beeper which sounds when you touch the two probes together. This is really useful for checking for continuity on solder joints, for example.

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            • #7
              It is Plusivo digital multimeter. No model#.
              It's funny how some stories became historic,
              especially when the authors clearly wrote them to be metaphoric,
              But people will believe anything when it's written in stone or ancient scroll...-Fat Mike

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              • #8
                Just turn the dial until it works.
                The things that you wanted
                I bought them for you

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                • #9
                  Looks like the ohms are in the 5 o'clock to 8'clcok positions on the dial. The thing that looks like a triangle at about 4 o'clock is the symbol for a diode check. You should get a buzzer or a beeper or whatever on this setting when you touch the probes together. That's your circuit checker for solder joints - buzz or beep = good joint.

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                  • #10
                    Here's one that I've found helpful:



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                    • #11
                      Thank you
                      It's funny how some stories became historic,
                      especially when the authors clearly wrote them to be metaphoric,
                      But people will believe anything when it's written in stone or ancient scroll...-Fat Mike

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        What setting should I use to test the capacitors? I'm not getting continuity between the leads but I am getting continuity if both proves are on the casing. Should I be getting continuity between the two leads? Am I testing the caps wrong? Is this a had cap? How do I get a reading of the value of the cap? I'm not getting a reading when I put the probes on the leads.
                        It's funny how some stories became historic,
                        especially when the authors clearly wrote them to be metaphoric,
                        But people will believe anything when it's written in stone or ancient scroll...-Fat Mike

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Typically DMMs only test voltage, current, resistance and an audible diode or continuity test. Capacitor testers are available, but usually cost more than a DMM.

                          Capacitors block DC, so if you check resistance on the leads it should be infinite or extremely high after a small time period. If you are getting infinite resistance on the cap leads, there is a high probability the cap is good.

                          Edit - it appears Capacitor testers have significantly come down in price, since I last purchased. That's what you want to accurately measure capacitance.
                          Last edited by JamesPaul; 08-01-2021, 10:34 AM.
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                          Seymour Duncans currently in use - In Les Pauls: Custom(b)/Jazz(n), Distortion(b)/Jazz(n), '59(b)/'59(n) w/A4 mag, P-Rails(b)/P-Rails(n); In a Bullet S-3: P-Rails(b)/stock/Vintage Stack Tele(n); In a Dot: Seth Lover(b)/Seth Lover(n); In a Del Mar: Mag Mic; In a Lead II: Custom Shop Fender X-1(b)

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mikelamury View Post
                            What setting should I use to test the capacitors?
                            As mentioned, most meters don't test for capacitance unless you look for those models in advance as included.

                            None of my regular multimeters test for capacitance so I bought one solely for that purpose.
                            Honeytek A6013L, which is right around $20.00 on Amazon.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Mikelamury View Post
                              What setting should I use to test the capacitors? I'm not getting continuity between the leads but I am getting continuity if both proves are on the casing. Should I be getting continuity between the two leads? Am I testing the caps wrong? Is this a had cap? How do I get a reading of the value of the cap? I'm not getting a reading when I put the probes on the leads.
                              The one in the pic you posted doesn't read capacitance.

                              This one does https://www.plusivo.com/multimeters/...ultimeter.html

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