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High Voltage Humbucker vs Trembucker - different DC resistance?

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  • High Voltage Humbucker vs Trembucker - different DC resistance?

    Hi there,

    I used to live on this forum, rarely here now but still a heavy SD user. With that being said, I have an Ash bodied Warmoth Strat with a Duncan Custom Trembucker and a single Cool Rails in the neck. Sounds great. I dig the Custom and I'm certainly not getting rid of it, but I'm in the mood to try something with a slightly more vintage sounding. Something that doesn't have a ceramic magnet. I'm considering the '59 Trembucker and the High Voltage Trembucker. I already had a 78 (also great) but want to try something new.

    The point is.... I noticed that on the Duncan website as well as Sweetwater of course sell the standard humbucker version which is obviously designed to go in a Gibson, but to my surprise there's also a Trembucker version of the High Voltage that has a notably higher DC resistance -- regular is 8.6k and Trembucker is 9.4k... this is curious as I don't think there's usually a big difference between the two versions.

    Am I wrong to think the Trembucker version is wound a bit hotter because it's designed to go into a Strat or similar bolt on neck guitar instead of an SG? I mean if you make a pickup called High Voltage, it's got to at least give you a mean rock crunch in any guitar, yeah? Or am I just missing something?

    Thanks,
    Max

  • #2
    I think there is usually that difference because the trems use a wider bobbin so it must be wound to a higher dcr in-order to sound the same, or close to the same.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by dave74 View Post
      I think there is usually that difference because the trems use a wider bobbin so it must be wound to a higher dcr in-order to sound the same, or close to the same.
      This is the reason a Trembucker is usually hotter. Usually it is like .5k hotter or so, but on some winds it is more. The Screamin Demon has a bigger difference, for instance. I wouldn't put too much into the numbers, though. You aren't going to hear the Trembucker as noticeably hotter than the normal one.
      Dave, Ambassador/Writer/Artist for Seymour Duncan

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      • #4
        Gotcha. Thanks for the info guys!

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        • #5
          Sound and output goes by the number of turns, not the DC resistance. So a bigger bobbin has more wire, hence more resistance from the amount of wire. But the number of turns makes the sound and output. Trembuckers should not be hotter. They are wound to sound the same.

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          • #6
            I think we shouldnt focus too much on the dcr numbers. But in the floor production it really differs a lot sometimes. For SD humbuckers, i measured lower than the advertised generally. For duncan singles, oppsitely, higher somehow.
            nienturi
            Tone Member
            Last edited by nienturi; 05-26-2023, 11:53 PM.
            Official Author of Guitarism Section of SOUND Magazine, TR

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            "A mind is like a parachute. It doesn't work if it is not open." Frank Zappa

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            • #7
              My bet is the `78 model is pretty close to the high voltage.

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