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Resistor in series with tone cap?

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  • freefrog
    replied
    For the record, the PTB circuit can be wired on a Fender TBX pot, giving either (no-load) normal low-pass / hi-cut 250k tone control, either the hi-pass / low-cut effect on the 1M side. The physical organization of this dual pot makes it pretty logical: "normal" tone pot from 0 to 4.5/10, unadultered tone @ 5/10 (center detent position) and low-cut effect from 5 to 10/10.

    But again, fuzz pedals and some other drive effects don't work well after a cap in series: it kills their gain.

    It can be heard for instance at 0:57 in this vid that I've already shared:



    That being said to help and not to pollute the discussion.

    Leave a comment:


  • Supernautilus
    replied
    Originally posted by magillver View Post
    Yup, that's exactly what I have wired, except that I grabbed whichever 1meg pot I had in my parts drawer, so it's probably linear...
    Yeah I’m using a 1 meg too but I forget what kind. It works but I don’t like that I have to wire it backwards for it to work correctly. But I found out G&L sells the correct reverse taper ones so I bought a couple. Kinda expensive but worth it for me, based on my preferences.

    Here’s a link if you are interested:

    Fits all US G&L instruments which have plastic knobs on volume and tone controls such as Legacy model. For 250KA only, you may choose the short-bushing version for mounting through control plate or pickguard. All others with long-bushing will work for control plate, pickguard, or body mount. Additional washers are

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  • magillver
    replied
    Yup, that's exactly what I have wired, except that I grabbed whichever 1meg pot I had in my parts drawer, so it's probably linear...

    Leave a comment:


  • Supernautilus
    replied
    Originally posted by magillver View Post
    sorry, I fumble-fingered that one (I'm in the back of an Uber) ... Again, a .0022 cap (not .022) wired across the output and sweeper on the pot, very simple circuit. Like I said, I'll post the diagram in a bit ..
    Just for reference, this is the one I’m using. Though I just ordered the correct reverse taper 1M pots from G&L so I’ll soon be able to wire the bass cut the right way.

    It works pretty good though. I currently have it hooked up on an Epiphone EB bass. Very useful to get some clarity and cut through the mud when needed.

    Click image for larger version

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  • magillver
    replied
    sorry, I fumble-fingered that one (I'm in the back of an Uber) ... Again, a .0022 cap (not .022) wired across the output and sweeper on the pot, very simple circuit. Like I said, I'll post the diagram in a bit ..

    Leave a comment:


  • magillver
    replied
    Hi Supernautilus, I had bought a premade push/pull pot from Guitar Electronics (https://guitarelectronics.com/dmt-du...-tone-control/)
    just to mess with, but it could only do high-cut in one position, and low-cut in the other, that's when I decided to try the method I mentioned earlier. I'll look for my actual source, once I get to a proper computer, but it's basically a 1 Meg ohm pot, with a .0022uf cap

    Leave a comment:


  • Supernautilus
    replied
    Originally posted by magillver View Post
    Hi '59, one thing that I've done on a couple of strats is to make both of the tone controls master controls, then wire one as a 'normal' high-cut filter, then wire the other as a low-cut filter, gives you a lot of unusual tone options...
    Do you mean the “PTB” passive tone and treble control wiring? Because I’ve been experimenting with that lately too. Very interesting and useful.

    Though it’s been a little confusing since I’ve found like 2 or 3 different wiring schemes. Mind if I ask which one you are using?
    Last edited by Supernautilus; 10-05-2023, 04:45 PM.

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  • AlexR
    replied
    Originally posted by '59 View Post

    Is this possible to do on a Fender Stratocaster? It's a 2007 MIM Standard Strat. I bought it new and I haven't replaced any of the parts on it so it's stock. Except for the strings I guess, but I don't think that would change anything.
    Its possible on any guitar with controls. You just turn your fingers a little less and the control gets to 3

    Leave a comment:


  • ArtieToo
    replied
    Originally posted by Chistopher View Post
    This thread inspired me to test out a 4.7k in series with my 0.01 uF tone control. It actually makes a world of a difference, but only at 0. Before with such a small cap 0 sounded like a cocked wah, now it just sounds like a standard 0.022 uF tone control rolled back to about 3 or 4.

    I like it, I will be doing it to a few of my other guitars.
    Good info. I might try this on one of my guitars also.

    Leave a comment:


  • freefrog
    replied
    Warning with low cut filters, fuzz pedals don't like 'em.

    Leave a comment:


  • magillver
    replied
    Hi '59, one thing that I've done on a couple of strats is to make both of the tone controls master controls, then wire one as a 'normal' high-cut filter, then wire the other as a low-cut filter, gives you a lot of unusual tone options...

    Leave a comment:


  • Chistopher
    replied
    This thread inspired me to test out a 4.7k in series with my 0.01 uF tone control. It actually makes a world of a difference, but only at 0. Before with such a small cap 0 sounded like a cocked wah, now it just sounds like a standard 0.022 uF tone control rolled back to about 3 or 4.

    I like it, I will be doing it to a few of my other guitars.

    Leave a comment:


  • marcello252
    replied
    Originally posted by '59 View Post

    Is this possible to do on a Fender Stratocaster? It's a 2007 MIM Standard Strat. I bought it new and I haven't replaced any of the parts on it so it's stock. Except for the strings I guess, but I don't think that would change anything.
    yes, if you turn the pot full on one side the resistance it's 0, or at least negligible

    Leave a comment:


  • marcello252
    replied
    Originally posted by ArtieToo View Post

    If that's a question . . . the answer is yes.

    (There's no difference.)
    it's not, it was a statement

    Leave a comment:


  • '59
    replied
    Originally posted by AlexR View Post
    I just don;t go to zero.
    Is this possible to do on a Fender Stratocaster? It's a 2007 MIM Standard Strat. I bought it new and I haven't replaced any of the parts on it so it's stock. Except for the strings I guess, but I don't think that would change anything.

    Leave a comment:

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