banner

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Took the cover off of a humbucker...how do I fix this?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    The easiest way to remove a cover, for future reference, is to first break the solder joints on the bottom either by desoldering or cutting through it, then heat it up to soften the wax and it'll slip off a lot easier. Then use the hairdryer to soften the wax and wipe it off. Do not scrape with anything.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by ehdwuld View Post

      Wiping is dangerous
      but scraping is ok?

      Serious

      Are you just in mood today?
      did I say scraping is good? where exactly?

      Comment


      • #18
        so is typing
        sit back on your hands
        and dont do anything
        safest thing to do

        anything you do has some element of risk

        heating it and it will run off onto a papertowel
        with the wiping just like cleaning a babies nose

        you are just being contradictory
        EHD
        Just here surfing Guitar Pron
        RG2EX1 w/ SD hot-rodded pickups / RG4EXFM1 w/ Carvin S22j/b + FVN middle
        SR500 / Martin 000CE-1/Epiphone Hummingbird
        Epiphone Florentine with OEM Probuckers
        Ehdwuld branded Blue semi hollow custom with JB/Jazz
        Reptile Green Gibson Custom Studio / Aqua Dean Shire semi hollow with piezo
        Carvin Belair / Laney GC80A Acoustic Amp (a gift from Guitar Player Mag)
        GNX3000 (yea I'm a modeler)

        Comment


        • #19
          I got the point, but I wiped a HB (the one coming from a G&L asat deluxe) with wax soften with my wife hairdryer (since this device is useless for my egg head) and I broke it , maybe tgere was a loosen wire, don't know what, so, if you're not skilled my advice is not doing it , so simple

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by ErikH View Post
            The easiest way to remove a cover, for future reference, is to first break the solder joints on the bottom either by desoldering or cutting through it, then heat it up to soften the wax and it'll slip off a lot easier. Then use the hairdryer to soften the wax and wipe it off. Do not scrape with anything.
            I got a 40w soldering iron, is it good enough for the cover solder joints? 70-80w would probably be better to heat up the area quicker, what do you think? Mine works fine for pot and switch lugs, but I struggle with the solder joints on the back of the pots, takes too long to melt the solder and I ruined few pots because of that.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by marcello252 View Post
              I got the point, but I wiped a HB (the one coming from a G&L asat deluxe) with wax soften with my wife hairdryer (since this device is useless for my egg head) and I broke it , maybe tgere was a loosen wire, don't know what, so, if you're not skilled my advice is not doing it , so simple
              we good
              just wondering why you were against the idea

              thanks for clarifying
              EHD
              Just here surfing Guitar Pron
              RG2EX1 w/ SD hot-rodded pickups / RG4EXFM1 w/ Carvin S22j/b + FVN middle
              SR500 / Martin 000CE-1/Epiphone Hummingbird
              Epiphone Florentine with OEM Probuckers
              Ehdwuld branded Blue semi hollow custom with JB/Jazz
              Reptile Green Gibson Custom Studio / Aqua Dean Shire semi hollow with piezo
              Carvin Belair / Laney GC80A Acoustic Amp (a gift from Guitar Player Mag)
              GNX3000 (yea I'm a modeler)

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by AdrianSD View Post

                I got a 40w soldering iron, is it good enough for the cover solder joints? 70-80w would probably be better to heat up the area quicker, what do you think? Mine works fine for pot and switch lugs, but I struggle with the solder joints on the back of the pots, takes too long to melt the solder and I ruined few pots because of that.
                40w should be fine. Make sure the tip is cleaned and tinned. Might need a wider tip to better heat dispersion. I have a Weller variable temp iron that works great.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by ErikH View Post

                  40w should be fine. Make sure the tip is cleaned and tinned. Might need a wider tip to better heat dispersion. I have a Weller variable temp iron that works great.
                  Right, will have to try with a chisel tip next time, been using conical ones for convenience. Thanks

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    It's the temperature that allows you to solder jobs that require more heat dispersion. So if you have a variable temp iron that gets up to 700 or so, that'll do the job. A little 40 watt iron that isn't variable temp likely won't do the job. If the tip doesn't start to glow a little bit, it won't be hot enough for pot backs and bridges. Either get a variable temp one, or get a 80 or 100+ watt one. You can use the little 40 watt iron for pot and switch lugs and the big fat one for pot backs, humbucker covers, or bridges.
                    The things that you wanted
                    I bought them for you

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Yeah, Clint is right. An iron with close to 100W and a chisel tip for soldering covers on pups is best. The 40W is good for lugs and probably fine for pot backs, but the 100W is better.
                      You can't hurt a pot or pup cover with a 100W iron, but you CAN with a 40W iron. It's not so much the amount of heat on the back of a pot or cover that will destroy it, but rather how LONG the heat stays in contact with the pot. With a 40W iron you need to keep the iron in contact with the pot a long time to get it hot enough to melt the solder. This time causes the heat to dissipate throughout all of the pot, possibly causing damage. And with a 40W iron you will tend to add lots of solder quickly without getting the pot back hot enough (for fear of hurting it) and you will get solder "blobs and "cold solder joints". With a high watt iron, it heats the pot instantly and melts the solder before the heat has time to dissipate to the more delicate parts of the pot.

                      Just remember three things for soldering excellence: 1) "Meat follows heat", meaning, heat the metal and let the solder flow onto it...do not heat the solder and let it drip onto the (cold-er) metal. that gives you "cold" solder joints and solder blobs. 2) Keep the solder as thin as water, just barely enough to coat the wire and lug/pot back. Too much solder just adds more heat, that you don't want, and it doesn't contribute anything AT ALL to the strength of the joint. 3) A lot of heat for a short duration of time is MUCH, MUCH better than a small amount of heat for a long period of time.

                      [I've been referring to potential damage to pots, but everything is multiplied 10 times when soldering a pup cover on. The metals are much thicker and take much more heat to get them hot enough to melt solder. If the heat (even a small amount) is left on too long the least damage that can happen is melting the wax potting. But the solder connections INSIDE the pup can be melted and even the thin winding wire can be damaged. And the cost of a pup is also 10 times the cost of a pot]

                      So be careful and use a heat sink if possible.
                      Originally Posted by IanBallard
                      Rule of thumb... the more pot you have, the better your tone.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        i have an old weller station that goes to like 850 or something? but i also keep a 100w chisel tip iron handy for quick hot needs when they present themselves.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          ^ That's what it's all about!
                          The things that you wanted
                          I bought them for you

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            I use the cheap ones
                            my only issue has been build up on the tip
                            Insulating it

                            Or the tip nut is loose
                            Not getting good contact
                            Or good het transfer

                            Remember to check this before starting
                            Dont want to try tightening whie hot
                            EHD
                            Just here surfing Guitar Pron
                            RG2EX1 w/ SD hot-rodded pickups / RG4EXFM1 w/ Carvin S22j/b + FVN middle
                            SR500 / Martin 000CE-1/Epiphone Hummingbird
                            Epiphone Florentine with OEM Probuckers
                            Ehdwuld branded Blue semi hollow custom with JB/Jazz
                            Reptile Green Gibson Custom Studio / Aqua Dean Shire semi hollow with piezo
                            Carvin Belair / Laney GC80A Acoustic Amp (a gift from Guitar Player Mag)
                            GNX3000 (yea I'm a modeler)

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Sorry OP for hijacking the thread, yet very useful tips being posted here. Heat matters, really does. I had to fix a screw hole on a JB trembucker baseplate that got way, way too loose with time. It's one of my fav pickups and had to fix it, so I bought a set of small solder lugs, sanded the small hole side, cut it to size and tried to solder it to the base plate. What a fscken pita with the 40w Mickey mouse toy. Got the job done eventually but very frustrating, the heat dissipates through the base plate and the little fella just doesn't cut it.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Now-a-days it's ridiculous not to have a 100W iron...they are so cheap! Here's a kit for under $15 that has a digital display and adjustable heat up to 932 degrees, 5 extra tips, a sponge tip cleaner, and solder.




                                But instead of using the wet sponge to keep the iron tip clean, use this (not only does it clean the tip better, but it doesn't cool it down like the wet sponge):



                                I would also recommend using flux paste in a tube or syringe (easier to use than liquid or thick paste in a tin).

                                I use flux every time I use the solder (even my rosin core solder). It makes the solder flow even better. Works especially good on hard to solder or hard to heat metals (like pup covers and baseplates). I also use the tip cleaner every time I pick up my iron off its stand, and every time I put it back on the stand. My iron tip never gets gunked up...always shiny clean.

                                Originally Posted by IanBallard
                                Rule of thumb... the more pot you have, the better your tone.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X