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What exactly is the point of modes?

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  • #16
    Alright, now I get what playing modal progressions is about, but I still can't understand how improvising would sound different in a dorian/ionian/phyrigian etc. I think I'm going to have to ask someone to show me by means of an instrument instead of text.

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    • #17
      generally its this...
      notes sound different depending on what chords are underneath. just like: soloing in Am sounds way different than C major, although it is the same notes.
      Dave, Ambassador/Writer/Artist for Seymour Duncan

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      • #18
        Playing through all the E major modes over an Emajor chord will not sound dramatically different. Starting on an E note and playing different modes will though. If you rotate them in 4ths, you go from an E major tonality to an Edom7 tonality, to an Emin7 tonality to an Emin7b13 tonality ect.....

        Add the modes from the harmonic minor scale to that and you get some really cool and outside tonalities, depending on what you are playing them over.
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        • #19
          well, my point is, soloing using the notes in the key of E over an E chord sounds a lot different than soloing over a F#m7-G#m7 progression using the same notes.

          If you were just 'playing through the modes' over an E chord, well you are not playing through any modes at all. You are just using E major. When you change the harmony, using other chords in the key of E is when you would use the modes. This is when you would hear a distinct difference between them.
          Dave, Ambassador/Writer/Artist for Seymour Duncan

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