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What to do once all major scale positions are memorized

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    Ascension
    Mojo's Minions

  • Ascension
    replied
    Here is another track clip from Stel. Note how he doesn't just play straight notes here, how he slurs into or bends into a note and uses vibrato. This gives a solo life and makes it more fluid and musical. I have learned a lot from this guy as a player and love his feel. First get yourself to the point you can play fluidly over a progression then start working on the feel and dynamics like Stel uses here. This sets a player apart and makes your playing become more emotional and expressive.

    Leave a comment:

  • Ascension
    Mojo's Minions

  • Ascension
    replied
    Originally posted by '59 View Post
    If you want to learn to make your own lead lines, everyone says "memorize the pentatonic and then the major shapes"

    Now that I've learned pentatonic, major, and minor, what do I do with that information?
    Suggest that you start hitting the Jam tracks on Youtube. Tracks like this one and just improvise and flow to them.
    Use the relative minor the relative major and pentatonic scales then try and link them to be able to flow all over the neck with a melody line. Example is my Buddy Stel here with his almost identical Kiesel Delos to the guitar I just got. Just flow with the track and try to find a flowing melody that works for the track. If you play the pure and Pentatonic major and minor scales most of the time you will play in key. The trick is making it musical and flowing.

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  • Seashore
    Ultimate Tone Member

  • Seashore
    replied
    I come up with a lot of my melodies using my voice. Listen to a chord progression a few times, and then hum or sing your own melody over it, and then figure out how to play that, and then embellish it if you want.

    Leave a comment:

  • Blille
    Mojo's Minions

  • Blille
    replied
    Originally posted by GuitarStv View Post

    I didn't say I hated you!

    When I was learning what modes were I found it super confusing when people gave explanations like that. Playing C major over a B drone note is technically modal playing . . . but it won't sound like locrian because you're not understanding the relationship of the notes. So younger me was always thinking "why does all this modal stuff sound like garbage when I do it". IMHO, until you have a very solid grasp of note locations and intervals you'll never understand modes - learning the major scale and trying to translate it into modes is largely useless.
    Lol good

    I hear where you’re coming from and don’t disagree.

    A Ionian lick that sounds good over CM7 may sound boring over Dm7 even if it’s technically “correct”. Agreed.

    Personally after I understood the modes I found it more helpful to play the three minor pentatonics per key to gain an intuition of how they sound over what chord and just used the modes to “fill in the blanks”. Then I went on to arpeggios and did the same.

    Leave a comment:

  • Gtrjunior
    Mojo's Minions

  • Gtrjunior
    replied
    Originally posted by GuitarStv View Post

    I didn't say I hated you!

    When I was learning what modes were I found it super confusing when people gave explanations like that. Playing C major over a B drone note is technically modal playing . . . but it won't sound like locrian because you're not understanding the relationship of the notes. So younger me was always thinking "why does all this modal stuff sound like garbage when I do it". IMHO, until you have a very solid grasp of note locations and intervals you'll never understand modes - learning the major scale and trying to translate it into modes is largely useless.
    This is why it’s crucial to be able to target chord tones at will.
    It’s the non-chord tone that give each mode it’s flava…lol

    And, as I said earlierā€¦.easier said than done.

    This is why I really like the caged system.
    All the modes are still there. You just shift the scales to where they need to be. Againā€¦.easier said then done.

    Leave a comment:

  • GuitarStv
    Sock Market Trader

  • GuitarStv
    replied
    Originally posted by Blille View Post

    Lol

    Well, today I learned that you have a pretty low threshold for hate

    We said the same except that I said same notes and you said same fretboard patterns, right?

    B Locrian is B C D E F G A B
    C Ionian is C D E F G A B

    Same notes AND fretboard pattern, right? Can we be friends again?
    I didn't say I hated you!

    When I was learning what modes were I found it super confusing when people gave explanations like that. Playing C major over a B drone note is technically modal playing . . . but it won't sound like locrian because you're not understanding the relationship of the notes. So younger me was always thinking "why does all this modal stuff sound like garbage when I do it". IMHO, until you have a very solid grasp of note locations and intervals you'll never understand modes - learning the major scale and trying to translate it into modes is largely useless.

    Leave a comment:

  • Blille
    Mojo's Minions

  • Blille
    replied
    Originally posted by GuitarStv View Post

    I kinda hate when people say this. The modes are the same fretboard patterns. Radically different note relationships to each other. You need to understand exactly what that relationship is in order to use them properly . . . otherwise you don't get modal sounds.
    Lol

    Well, today I learned that you have a pretty low threshold for hate

    We said the same except that I said same notes and you said same fretboard patterns, right?

    B Locrian is B C D E F G A B
    C Ionian is C D E F G A B

    Same notes AND fretboard pattern, right? Can we be friends again?

    Leave a comment:

  • GuitarStv
    Sock Market Trader

  • GuitarStv
    replied
    Originally posted by Blille View Post
    I mean, if you know the major scale you know the modes. You just need to understand how it works but it’s the same notes.
    I kinda hate when people say this. The modes are the same fretboard patterns. Radically different note relationships to each other. You need to understand exactly what that relationship is in order to use them properly . . . otherwise you don't get modal sounds.

    Leave a comment:

  • Blille
    Mojo's Minions

  • Blille
    replied
    I mean, if you know the major scale you know the modes. You just need to understand how it works but it’s the same notes.

    Leave a comment:

  • Demanic
    PenultimateTone Member

  • Demanic
    replied
    I'm a particular fan of Mixolydian and Locrian.

    Leave a comment:

  • Demanic
    PenultimateTone Member

  • Demanic
    replied
    Well, have you mastered the modes?
    Click image for larger version

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  • Mincer
    Administrator

  • Mincer
    replied
    I believe they were named after regions in ancient Greece. The trick with the modes is to use them over the right chords. Only then you can hear what they actually sound like.

    Leave a comment:

  • '59
    Ultimate Tone Member

  • '59
    replied
    Sorry I haven't been able to get back to respond to this, but I have been reading your responses and have found them helpful in transforming musically acceptable sounds into music.

    Just a side note, what do the mode names come from? Did they at one point mean something?

    Leave a comment:

  • PFDarkside
    of the Forum

  • PFDarkside
    replied
    Originally posted by Securb View Post

    It is funny I will be learning something overly technical and overthinking it and it hits me more often than not "Hey that is just a blues lick".
    Same for me. My favorite Satch and Vai licks are when they throw a blues lick in the middle of their solo.

    Leave a comment:

  • Gtrjunior
    Mojo's Minions

  • Gtrjunior
    replied
    Originally posted by Chistopher View Post

    This right here. The difference between lil guys and good players is you're ability to solo diagonally across the neck.
    And target chord tones at will.


    Easier said than done

    Leave a comment:

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