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Bye bye roasted maple

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  • Bye bye roasted maple

    The past 4 years I’ve had a roasted maple neck on my Warmoth build. While I love the look and feel of it, there’s one problem. Black side dots. Wish I got it with white. I got it from the Showcase so it was a good deal then and couldn’t change the side dots anyway, sooo….. yeah.

    Took the plunge and attempted to put some luminlay side dots in place of the black. Unded up messing up though I was careful. The center punch didn’t punch deep enough (though it looked it) and the bit (brand new and sharp) drifted just enough. I finished it but they are not straight. Dang it.

    So, new neck coming from the Showcase. Plain maple shaft and board this time, modern construction, Wolfgang profile. I’ll finish it with wipe-on poly satin finish like my old Warmoth neck that’s 30 years old. Lots of playing will color it nicely.

    Next time I want to change the side dots I’ll let a luthier do it. I definitely need more practice at it. The neck isn’t unplayable, my ocd will be bothered by the few that aren’t in line. It’s not terrible, but noticeable.
    Last edited by ErikH; 01-17-2024, 10:41 AM.

  • #2
    I've tried free-handing side dots 20+ times, and never been happy with the results. I finally built a tiny jig that makes it impossible to screw them up; made from scrap and took 20 minutes.

    Sometimes I'm too damned stubborn for my own good.

    Larry

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    • #3
      I like my roasted Maple neck with the black dots, but honestly, it barely even looks roasted at all, LOL. It kinda looks like the vintage tint neck on my old Squier CV, just less orange a bit more brown. But it still looks like maple. It doesn't really look dark brown like I've seen some roasted Maple necks are.

      Click image for larger version

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      • #4
        I have a roasted maple in my cheapest guitar, a Harley Benton te52 I bought at christmas out of pure curiosity, and I think it's gorgeous looking, so much that I'm considering buying a roasted neck for a bit more valuable old partscaster tele I have here which needs refretting

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        • #5
          By "hole punch" I assume you meant "center punch"?

          Sounds like you used a "Twist" (standard type) drill bit. Those are notorious for wandering/drifting. The best choice to prevent the bit from wandering would be a "Brad Point" drill bit. Second choice would be a "Forstner" bit.

          As a third choice, if only using twist drill bits, would be to first use a much smaller bit (up to 1/16"), then use the full-sized bit (or even do it in multiple small steps depending on the final diameter).
          Originally Posted by IanBallard
          Rule of thumb... the more pot you have, the better your tone.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by GuitarDoc View Post
            By "hole punch" I assume you meant "center punch"?

            Sounds like you used a "Twist" (standard type) drill bit. Those are notorious for wandering/drifting. The best choice to prevent the bit from wandering would be a "Brad Point" drill bit. Second choice would be a "Forstner" bit.

            As a third choice, if only using twist drill bits, would be to first use a much smaller bit (up to 1/16"), then use the full-sized bit (or even do it in multiple small steps depending on the final diameter).
            Yes, I meant center punch. Typed that out late last night. Will correct. And thanks for the tips on the drillbits. If I ever attempt this again, I’ll keep that in mind.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by larryguitar View Post
              I've tried free-handing side dots 20+ times, and never been happy with the results. I finally built a tiny jig that makes it impossible to screw them up; made from scrap and took 20 minutes.

              Sometimes I'm too damned stubborn for my own good.

              Larry
              Yup, I can understand that. A jig is a good idea. Probably should look in to doing that with projects like these. Live and learn.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Rex_Rocker View Post
                I like my roasted Maple neck with the black dots, but honestly, it barely even looks roasted at all, LOL. It kinda looks like the vintage tint neck on my old Squier CV, just less orange a bit more brown. But it still looks like maple. It doesn't really look dark brown like I've seen some roasted Maple necks are.

                Click image for larger version

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                It'll get darker. Especially if it doesn't have a finish. As you play it, your skin oils and whatever else will get in to the wood and it will naturally darken. Mine was a lot lighter when I got it but got to the point where seeing the black side dots was really tough in darker lighting. That Strat looks great, btw.

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                • #9
                  It's a mistake everyone makes because they just don't know that these other types of bits exist.
                  Originally Posted by IanBallard
                  Rule of thumb... the more pot you have, the better your tone.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by GuitarDoc View Post
                    It's a mistake everyone makes because they just don't know that these other types of bits exist.
                    Honestly, I know they exist, I just didn't think that using one of them would be the better option. I do now though, LOL.

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                    • #11
                      +1
                      Originally Posted by IanBallard
                      Rule of thumb... the more pot you have, the better your tone.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Rex_Rocker View Post
                        I like my roasted Maple neck with the black dots, but honestly, it barely even looks roasted at all, LOL. It kinda looks like the vintage tint neck on my old Squier CV, just less orange a bit more brown. But it still looks like maple. It doesn't really look dark brown like I've seen some roasted Maple necks are.

                        Click image for larger version

Name:	418731462_10161602327240746_121739033041150557_n.jpg?_nc_cat=110&ccb=1-7&_nc_sid=3635dc&_nc_ohc=dDnl3pqEaWwAX9FEA1Q&_nc_ht=scontent.fyvr3-1.fna&oh=00_AfAd8IBbsGLOfUbkD5Q0KFKbpr1Izrr9l0VrDUn420b3yQ&oe=65AC3E22.jpg
Views:	375
Size:	52.6 KB
ID:	6267172
                        I love that guitar.

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                        • #13
                          changing the side dots on already built neck would be super hard even with a jig. You were brave for even trying!

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                          • #14
                            Don't be too hard on yourself- without the right tools and skill, this is not an easy thing to do. I don't think I would try it.
                            Administrator of the SDUGF

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by blakejcan View Post
                              changing the side dots on already built neck would be super hard even with a jig. You were brave for even trying!
                              It was probably the most difficult task of working on a guitar I have done. A jig and drill press with the proper bit would have been much better.


                              Originally posted by Mincer View Post
                              Don't be too hard on yourself- without the right tools and skill, this is not an easy thing to do. I don't think I would try it.
                              At first I was pretty ticked at myself but decided to finish the job and see what it was like from there. If you don't care about a few dots not being 100% in line, sure, it's fine. Good news though is I listed the neck for sale last night and a friend of a friend bought it this morning so it'll get shipped to Houston in the next day or so. I need to get a shipping tube and some bubble wrap. Recouping some of the cost of the new one anyway. Can't wait to feel that Wolfgang profile on this guitar. Always liked how the necks on the Peavey and EVH feel.

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