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What's going on in this control cavity?

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  • alex1fly
    replied
    OP here. This Tele doesn't have a layered body as I suspected - the grain is incredibly straight in some spots so it just looks that way. In others, it's clearly the same piece of wood. And despite the thick shield of finish, the body rings out quite a lot. I can strum a chord with normal velocity and feel the vibrations in the body some 12 seconds later. Anyways, just wanted to close the loop after spending more time with the guitar.

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  • JB_From_Hell
    replied
    My Tele Plus is alder with ash on the top and back. I’ll pop the control plate out and see if it looks similar to yours.

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  • Mincer
    replied
    Originally posted by greekdude View Post

    ppl claim that the less pieces of wood a guitar body is made of the better the quality, whereas for guitar necks it is the opposite : laminate 3,5,7-piece necks are considered supperior to 1-piece
    When they talk about bodies, they are generally talking about plywood. Many-piece necks are usually made of aesthetically pleasing wood chosen for the look and strength. Look at some of Orpheo's multi-laminate necks. He can tell you how that differs from multi-piece bodies glued together.

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  • greekdude
    replied
    Originally posted by alex1fly View Post

    Could be. Any reason to think this affects the resultant quality of the guitar, as opposed to if it were a solid piece?
    ppl claim that the less pieces of wood a guitar body is made of the better the quality, whereas for guitar necks it is the opposite : laminate 3,5,7-piece necks are considered supperior to 1-piece

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  • alex1fly
    replied
    Originally posted by Mincer View Post
    My thought is that they were just using up some extra pieces of wood.
    Could be. Any reason to think this affects the resultant quality of the guitar, as opposed to if it were a solid piece?

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  • Mincer
    replied
    Originally posted by greekdude View Post
    I got a Kramer from this era (210) and it is very heavy (4.2Kg). Never got to the wood, but it looks solid to me, e.g. it has floyd rose screws instead of inserts, no problem in the 30 yrs I own it, my same year Carvin cd135 had the wood (maple) colapse near the floyd rose studs.
    It isn't that these guitars are 'bad', but I think they were making them quickly, cheaply, and ready to rock. As long as it sort of looked the same as our idols. These companies were under dubious ownership at the time, too.

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  • Adieu
    replied
    Originally posted by greekdude View Post
    I got a Kramer from this era (210) and it is very heavy (4.2Kg). Never got to the wood, but it looks solid to me, e.g. it has floyd rose screws instead of inserts, no problem in the 30 yrs I own it, my same year Carvin cd135 had the wood (maple) colapse near the floyd rose studs.
    Collapsed maple?

    Is that even normally possible??? Sounds like some kind of manufacturing error, dud wood, or maybe a really hard impact to the bridge that transferred the force to the studs imho.

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  • greekdude
    replied
    I got a Kramer from this era (210) and it is very heavy (4.2Kg). Never got to the wood, but it looks solid to me, e.g. it has floyd rose screws instead of inserts, no problem in the 30 yrs I own it, my same year Carvin cd135 had the wood (maple) colapse near the floyd rose studs.

    Leave a comment:


  • Adieu
    replied
    Originally posted by Mincer View Post
    My thought is that they were just using up some extra pieces of wood. I know in the 80s, some Kramers and BC Riches were like 7 thin layers piled high like that.
    I think THAT was just plain old plywood (or, alternatively, ash, which can sometimes look like plywood plies in a pickup cavity)

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  • Mincer
    replied
    My thought is that they were just using up some extra pieces of wood. I know in the 80s, some Kramers and BC Riches were like 7 thin layers piled high like that.

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  • St_Genesius
    replied
    I honestly didn't know anyone was doing pancake construction anymore - multi-piece side-by-side, sure, but not top-to-back- but damn if that doesn't look like fairly convincing evidence for it.

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  • alex1fly
    replied
    Makes me want to crack it open... You know, like a geode

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  • alex1fly
    replied
    Originally posted by beaubrummels View Post
    yeah, different grain. looks like at least 2-piece front/back to me. not sure why there would be a top of the same type, unless it was supposed to be better looking grain, but then they painted it solid, so WTF? Maybe they didn't have a plank thick enough leftover to make a body?
    Yeah that's kind of what I'm wondering too. Why do a top if you're going to paint it? Could it have been destined for a natural finish at one point? Does it really matter? I suppose I could write in to Fender and see if that brings anything worthwhile to the investigation...

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  • beaubrummels
    replied
    yeah, different grain. looks like at least 2-piece front/back to me. not sure why there would be a top of the same type, unless it was supposed to be better looking grain, but then they painted it solid, so WTF? Maybe they didn't have a plank thick enough leftover to make a body?

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  • alex1fly
    replied
    Couple more
    Attached Files

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